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Found 11 results

  1. Last month Seattle-based photographer Christopher Boffoli sued Imgur claiming the popular image hosting site had failed to remove a few dozen of his photos. Before the case gets well underway the photographer is facing a much bigger problem, as 20,754 of his photos are now being shared on The Pirate Bay. When it comes to online piracy most attention usually goes out to music, TV-shows and movies. However, photos are arguably the most-infringed works online. Virtually every person on the Internet has shared a photo without obtaining permission from its maker, whether through social networks, blogs or other services. While most photographers spend little time on combating piracy, Seattle-based artist Christopher Boffoli has taken some of the largest web services to court for aiding these infringements Boffoli has filed lawsuits against Twitter, Google and others, which were settled out for court under undisclosed terms. Last month he started a new case against popular image sharing site Imgur after it allegedly ignored his takedown requests. The photographer asked the court to order an injunction preventing Imgur from making 73 of his photos available online. In addition, he requested millions of dollars in statutory damages for willful copyright infringement. Imgur has yet to file an official reply to the complaint. In the meantime, however, Boffoli’s actions appear to have triggered another less welcome response. A few days ago a user of The Pirate Bay decided to upload a rather large archive of the photographer’s work to the site. The archive in question is said to hold 20,754 images, including the most famous “Big Appetites†series. A torrent with 20,754 images The image archive, which is more than eight gigabytes in size, had to be partly wrapped in an .iso file because otherwise the .torrent file itself would have been too large. The description of the archive mentions Boffoli’s recent actions against Imgur, which could have triggered the upload. One of the commenters points out that the Imgur lawsuit may have done more harm than good, and a new Internet meme was born. “Sued for 73 images, got 20,754 uploaded to TPB, LOL. About the Big Appetites series, if I ever get my hands on a copy, I’ll scan it at 600 dpi and upload it here, have fun trying to censor the internet, Boffoli,†the commenter notes. TorrentFreak asked Boffoli for a comment on the leak and whether he will take steps to prevent the distribution, but we have yet to hear back. While not everyone may agree with the lawsuit against Imgur piracy can impact photographers quite a bit. It’s usually not the average Pirate Bay user that’s causing the damage though, but rather companies that use professional photos commercially without a license. Add Rep and Leave a feedback Reputation is the green button in the down right corner on my post
  2. MIne is Eminem Add Rep and Leave a feedback Reputation is the green button in the down right corner on my post Don't forget to press the thanks button
  3. On the eve of the brand new season of Doctor Who, yesterday the BBC and Federation Against Copyright Theft teamed up to close a long-standing fansite. Following an in-person visit, Doctor Who Media shut down immediately. Its domain name will soon be taken over by the BBC. In just a few hours time the brand new season of Doctor Who will premiere, kicking off with the first episode ‘Deep Breath’. There’s been a huge build up in the media, but for fans who prefer to socialize and obtain news via a dedicated community, today brings bad news. Doctor Who Media (DWM) was a site created in 2010 and during the ensuing four and a half years it amassed around 25,000 dedicated members. A source close to the site told TF that since nothing like it existed officially, DWM’s core focus was to provide a central location and community for everything in the “Whoniverseâ€, from reconstructions of missing episodes to the latest episodes, and whatever lay between. But yesterday, following a visit by representatives from the BBC and Federation Against Copyright Theft, the site’s operator took the decision to shut down the site for good. “I had a knock at the door and a couple of guys were there. One from FACT and one from BBCWW [bBC Worldwide]. The FACT guy basically explained what the issue was, said that he was there to give a cease and desist and wanted the domain transferred,†the site’s operator informs TorrentFreak. With threats of executing an official search warrant and taking the matter to court if terms could not be reached, there was never any question of embarking on a losing battle. With the user database secured, an agreement was quickly reached to close down the site and transfer the domain. Interestingly, however, the domain name will not be going to FACT as is usually the case. Doctor Who Media’s operator told TF that it will be transferred to the BBC as there are trademark issues involved. “DWM may have been a major factor of my life for the past few years, but I wasn’t going to let it ruin me, so I agreed, signed, the guy wrote down his mobile number in case there were any issues and then they went. They were about as nice as you could expect given the situation. It’s only a job after all,†he concludes. The tip about the site’s shutdown came from a DWM user who told TF that he’ll be sad to see its doors close for the final time. “I can’t speak for others but having that content available really helped raise my interest level in Doctor Who. Often times, having watched stuff there led to me purchasing the exact same content on iTunes as well as all the various other content available for Doctor Who,†he explained. And now, all eyes turn to the season premiere tonight. As of yesterday, all but the final episode of the brand new season had leaked to file-sharing sites, although it’s worth pointing out that Doctor Who Media refused to carry any of that content. Will the leaks have a positive or negative impact on viewing figures? There’s only a few hours to find out, but it’s doubtful the BBC will be weeping following tonight’s episode. http://torrentfreak.com/bbc-fact-shut-down-doctor-who-fansite-140823/
  4. Following leaks of both episode one and episode two of the brand new series of Doctor Who, another leak has appeared online. Running in sequence, episode three of season eight is now being made available on The Pirate Bay. Like those that came before it, the episode is an unfinished workprint copy. In July, news broke that following a serious error at a BBC office in Miami, the scripts and video to the brand new series of Doctor Who had accidentally been made available online. While the BBC closed down the security breach, it didn’t do so quickly enough. The scripts were made available on file-sharing networks first and they were soon followed by the leak of the first episode. Destined for Marcelo Camargo of Marc Drei Productions, a Brazil-based production company known for its subtitling work, the unfinished ‘workprint’ release wasn’t to be the last. Less than a week ago the first full copies of the second episode “Into The Dalek†started doing the rounds, prompting concerns of whether the leaks would stop there or continue. That question now seems to have been answered. A 1020Mb file currently being made available via The Pirate Bay is the third episode in the new series. The file follows the naming convention of the previous two leaks suggesting that the video comes from the same source. Rumored to be titled “Robots of Sherwoodâ€, the episode confirms details revealed in the leaked scripts and sees Doctor Who venturing back in time for a memorable meeting with Robin Hood. As can be seen from the screenshot, the episode is presented in monochrome and is heavily watermarked. Special effects and other elements of final polish also appear to be absent. The question now falls to whether the remaining three episodes of six will also leak to mainstream file-sharing networks such as BitTorrent. There are reports of episodes four, five and six appearing on the eD2K network (sometimes known as eDonkey) but thus far there are no confirmed full downloads. http://torrentfreak.com/third-unreleased-doctor-episode-leaks-online-140818/
  5. Last month news broke that the first episode of the new season of Doctor Who had leaked online. Reports that the second episode was also available faltered with no full copy publicly circulating online. That has now changed, with an unfinished workprint copy of 'Into the Dalek' now doing the rounds. Last month the file-sharing leak phenomenon hit the upcoming season of Doctor Who. Following a catastrophic error at a BBC office in Miami, not only were the new seasons’ scripts made available to the public, but several episodes too. It’s unclear how many people downloaded the videos directly from the server, but it soon became clear that episode one had leaked when it appeared on The Pirate Bay and other file-sharing sites. It was an unfinished ‘workprint’ release, destined for Marcelo Camargo of Marc Drei Productions, a Brazil-based production company known for its subtitling work. The image below shows how the content appeared on the BBC website. Soon after rumors turned to a potential leak of episode two. A torrent was certainly uploaded to The Pirate Bay, but whoever seeded that file in the first instance quickly backed away, leaving the torrent at just a few percent complete. This led many to presume that the release was a fake, but that wasn’t to be the case. A full copy was definitely waiting somewhere. On Sunday at least one torrent sprang back to life temporarily, surprising people who had patiently left it in their client to complete. While it reportedly went quiet again, another torrent appeared claiming to be of the same material. As both torrents completed confirmation arrived that the leak, which had lay dormant for several weeks, was indeed real. Weighing in just short of 987MB, the episode is called ‘Into the Dalek’ and once again it is another unfinished ‘workprint’ copy, as the screenshot below shows. In addition to being covered in text watermarks, the episode is presented in black and white, with many special effects absent. Its naming convention matches the screenshot above, suggesting that this leak was also obtained from the BBC website. While the BBC will be disappointed not to have contained this second episode, there are currently no signs that any of the remaining episodes have leaked to file-sharing networks. The leak is only the latest in a long line of workprint copies of movies and TV shows to be made available online. It certainly won’t be the last. http://torrentfreak.com/doctor-who-enter-the-dalek-workprint-fully-leaks-online-140812/
  6. As the Who ready themselves for their 50th anniversary tour, the group is asking fans worldwide to share rare and lost recordings, forgotten radio and TV performances, fan-shot footage from concerts, bootleg recordings, demos, rare photos and memorabilia. As an example, the group cites its 2002 film, The High Numbers at the Railway Hotel, which a Dutch fan had been holding onto since 1964. The Who will include the best and most interesting items in their forthcoming anniversary releases, crediting the fans who offered them up, and giving each respective fan two VIP tickets to a show on its upcoming tour. Fans with extraordinary odds & sods can email the group at thewho@umusic.com. Meanwhile, the group will put out a greatest hits collection, The Who Hits 50!, on October 28th, and Roger Daltrey, Pete Townshend & Co. are prepping for a Who Hits 50! tour that will take them to arenas in the U.K. this fall and North America in 2015. Additionally, over the next year, the group will mark its golden anniversary with releases and events that will commemorate the group's cultural impact. At a press conference in late June, Daltrey personified the upcoming tour as "the beginning of the long goodbye." The band has said that it would play "all the classic anthems" and deep cuts spanning its entire career, from when it was using the name the High Numbers to the present. "It will have a finality to it," the singer said of the trek. "We'll stop touring, I'm sure, before we stop playing as a band, but just like Eric Clapton said, the grind of the road [is] incredibly tough on the body."
  7. ​Whether it's a problem, or just a preventative measure, it's always a good idea to be aware of what devices are connecting to your home network. Sometimes a Wi-Fi password just isn't enough to keep a neighbor or a stranger from stealing your Internet connection. You may notice that websites, videos, or file transfers aren't moving as fast as they used to. The problem may not be theft, but simply a case of too many devices trying to share a slow connection. To get to the root of the issue you can use a free app for Windows. Let's investigate: Step 1: Install a copy of Who Is On My WiFi (henceforth known as WIOMW). Step 2: After opening the app, follow the tutorial steps, which will initiate your first (and likely a second) network scan. You can configure the port range that will be scanned, but if you just want to get started, you don't need to mess with any settings. List of devices currently connected to your network. You'll see a list of IP addresses appear in the app window after a scan. Each will be identified by MACaddress and local IP (the one your router/switch/modem assigned to it). Step 3: Start identifying the different devices on your network. If there are a lot of connections (like in the image above), it might be easiest to turn on Wi-Fi one device at a time so you can label them. To label, just click the Description box on the appropriate line, type a name, and then click Save in the top right-hand corner. If you're savvy with your devices and know where to find their local IP and/or MAC address, you can just use these as references for the labeling process. For example, tapping the currently connected Wi-Fi network on Android will display the local IP. WiFi connection details on an Android device. (Optional) Step 4: If you find out that someone is indeed leeching your Wi-Fi, you should change your wireless password. On a personal wireless router, just login using the credentials you chose when you set it up. When using a modem/router combo from your ISP, the process may become a bit more involved. Search for the make and model of your modem to find the default login (ISPs don't change these often). If you still cannot log in, contact your ISP to help you reset the password. Note that some devices which are hardwired into your network, and as such do not have Wi-Fi support, will show up in the list with "NO" in the Connected column. http://www.cnet.com/how-to/see-who-is-using-your-wifi-on-windows/
  8. Footage from the brand new and yet-to-air series of Doctor Who has leaked onto the Internet. Clearly unfinished, the heavily watermarked video carries markers which suggests that the copy was destined for a subtitling company in Brazil. Leaks of material not yet available to the public are always a curiosity online. Anything pre-release can generate excitement, particularly so if the item offers a unique window into the usually hidden production process. Back in 2009 the movie Wolverine appeared on the Internet in advance of its official release. The copy was unfinished and provided a version of the film to downloaders that would have otherwise remained hidden forever. Now that same dubious status has fallen to Doctor Who. After appearing online over the weekend, what claims to be episode one of the new series of the hit show was uploaded to The Pirate Bay today. The 1.49Gb file is marked as a “pre air screeneer†with a claimed running time of one hour and 16 mins. While leaks of TV shows are much more rare than movie leaks, this copy is particularly unusual. Clearly unfinished, the video is both heavily watermarked and monochrome. Marcelo Camargo is the owner of Marc Drei Productions, a Brazil-based production company known for its subtitling work. There is no suggestion that Camargo or his company is responsible for the leak. This is the second serious breach in a matter of days to hit Doctor Who and the BBC. Just last week scripts from the new series leaked online after inadvertently being made available to the public by a BBC Worldwide office in the U.S. It seems likely that this video comes from the same source.
  9. New research carried out in Sweden has revealed that the percentage of young people who have never shared files is up by almost 40% since 2009. Those who share files daily is down too, a development the researchers say is a victory for the legal market, as opposed to entertainment companies using legal scare tactics. piracydownSweden has long been a central figure in the file-sharing phenomenon, not least due to its associations with the The Pirate Bay. As a result, for more than ten years sharing files has been a popular pastime with many young Swedes, much to the disappointment of the world’s largest entertainment companies. The Cybernorms research group at Lund University in Sweden has been in the news several times during the past few years as a result of its work with The Pirate Bay. On more than one occasion the infamous torrent site as renamed itself to The Research Bay in order for researchers to collect information on the values, norms and conceptions of the file-sharing community. Cybernorms have now revealed more of their findings which suggest that after years of escalation, online sharing by those in the 15-24 year-old bracket could be in decline. Survey responses from around 4,000 individuals suggest that the number of active file-sharers has dropped in the past two years. Those who share files daily or almost daily has decreased from 32.8 percent in 2012 to 29 percent in 2014. “It is a small but significant decrease,†Måns Svensson, head of Cybernorms at Lund University told SVT. Perhaps the most interesting aspect of the decrease is the mechanism through which it was encouraged. Historically, entertainment industry scare tactics have been employed to try to reduce unauthorized sharing, but the researchers believe something much more positive is responsible. “What is interesting is that this is the first time we have been able to see that file-sharing has gone down but without that being associated with a conviction, such as the Pirate Bay ruling,†Svensson says. “If you listen to what young people themselves are saying, it is new and better legal services that have caused the decrease in file-sharing, rather than respect for the law. There has been a trend where alternative legal solutions such as Spotify and Netflix are changing consumption patterns among young people.†Also of interest is the apparent effect on up-and-coming youngsters who might otherwise have begun file-sharing themselves. The researchers found that between 2009 and 2013 the percentage of young people who had never shared files increased from 21.6 percent to 30.2 percent, a boost of well over a third. Interestingly, in that same four-year period, the percentage of young people who said they believe that people should not share files because it is illegal dropped from 24 percent to 16.9 percent. So, even while young people are sharing files less often, their acceptance of the standards presented by the law appears to be dropping too. In this case it does indeed appear that the carrot is mightier than the stick. Source : TorrentFreak.com
  10. Spotify's chief in Australia has hit back at suggestions that reasonably priced streaming services have done little to reduce piracy. “If you look at the main audience that is on Spotify, a lot of them are former pirates," Kate Vale said. "There are teenagers who have potentially never paid for their music before, and probably never will." In the continuing piracy debate one thing has been established beyond reasonable doubt. If an entertainment producer wants to make any dent in piracy, at the very least they’re going to have to make their products readily available at a fair price. This argument has gathered serious momentum in Australia during the past few years, with local consumers regularly criticizing international TV and movie companies for shipping products Down Under months after release and then charging unrealistic prices. But in a recent opinion piece, the principal analyst at local music royalty collection outfit APRA AMCOS disputed whether the arrival of services like Spotify that give consumers what they want, have actually done anything to reduce piracy rates. “Music’s had everything everybody now wants for television shows, such as Game of Thrones, for a couple of years: availability, access and a reasonable price. But the piracy issue still has not been solved,†Andrew Harris wrote. “In fact, results last month from our ongoing national research show that music piracy levels – just as they were almost two years ago – still sit at around the same level as that of movies and television shows.†Noting that Spotify offers content in Australia at the moment it’s released around the world and does so at one of the best prices, Harris arrives at a familiar conclusion. “We’ve heard it all before. No matter how loud the minority might shout it in anger as the answer, it’s impossible to compete with free.†Unsurprisingly that notion doesn’t sit well with Spotify, a company that was designed from the ground up to compete with piracy. Responding to Harris’s assertions in Australian Financial Review, Spotify Australia and New Zealand chief Kate Vale said that the company’s experiences told a different story. “We do believe that access, availability and price does contribute and is the answer and we have proven this in other markets across Europe and particularly in Sweden where we have seen a 30 per cent reduction in piracy since we launched about six years ago,†Vale said. Cracking Sweden was undoubtedly a major feat given the country’s long association with Internet piracy and Vale believes that Spotify now has the right formula to attract the most aggressive file-sharers – and make money from them. “If you look at the main audience that is on Spotify, a lot of them are former pirates. There are teenagers who have potentially never paid for their music before, and probably never will,†she said. “If we can get them on to a service that is free but legal, and they are contributing through our advertising on that free tier, then it is giving money back into the industry that they are just never going to get before.†The ad-supported tier of Spotify is undoubtedly a great incentive to get people to try the service. Globally the company says that it converts around a quarter of free users to premium subscribers but Australia actually tops that with 31%, suggesting that Aussies are happier than most to part with their hard-earned cash in exchange for a good product.
  11. Spotify's chief in Australia has hit back at suggestions that reasonably priced streaming services have done little to reduce piracy. “If you look at the main audience that is on Spotify, a lot of them are former pirates," Kate Vale said. "There are teenagers who have potentially never paid for their music before, and probably never will." In the continuing piracy debate one thing has been established beyond reasonable doubt. If an entertainment producer wants to make any dent in piracy, at the very least they’re going to have to make their products readily available at a fair price. This argument has gathered serious momentum in Australia during the past few years, with local consumers regularly criticizing international TV and movie companies for shipping products Down Under months after release and then charging unrealistic prices. But in a recent opinion piece, the principal analyst at local music royalty collection outfit APRA AMCOS disputed whether the arrival of services like Spotify that give consumers what they want, have actually done anything to reduce piracy rates. “Music’s had everything everybody now wants for television shows, such as Game of Thrones, for a couple of years: availability, access and a reasonable price. But the piracy issue still has not been solved,†Andrew Harris wrote. “In fact, results last month from our ongoing national research show that music piracy levels – just as they were almost two years ago – still sit at around the same level as that of movies and television shows.†Noting that Spotify offers content in Australia at the moment it’s released around the world and does so at one of the best prices, Harris arrives at a familiar conclusion. “We’ve heard it all before. No matter how loud the minority might shout it in anger as the answer, it’s impossible to compete with free.†Unsurprisingly that notion doesn’t sit well with Spotify, a company that was designed from the ground up to compete with piracy. Responding to Harris’s assertions in Australian Financial Review, Spotify Australia and New Zealand chief Kate Vale said that the company’s experiences told a different story. “We do believe that access, availability and price does contribute and is the answer and we have proven this in other markets across Europe and particularly in Sweden where we have seen a 30 per cent reduction in piracy since we launched about six years ago,†Vale said. Cracking Sweden was undoubtedly a major feat given the country’s long association with Internet piracy and Vale believes that Spotify now has the right formula to attract the most aggressive file-sharers – and make money from them. “If you look at the main audience that is on Spotify, a lot of them are former pirates. There are teenagers who have potentially never paid for their music before, and probably never will,†she said. “If we can get them on to a service that is free but legal, and they are contributing through our advertising on that free tier, then it is giving money back into the industry that they are just never going to get before.†The ad-supported tier of Spotify is undoubtedly a great incentive to get people to try the service. Globally the company says that it converts around a quarter of free users to premium subscribers but Australia actually tops that with 31%, suggesting that Aussies are happier than most to part with their hard-earned cash in exchange for a good product. Source: http://torrentfreak.com/spotify-we-m...orrentfreak%29