Invite Scene - #1 to Buy, Sell, Trade or Find Free Torrent Invites

#1 TorrentInvites Community. Buy, Sell, Trade or Find Free Torrent Invites for Every Private Torrent Trackers. HDB, BTN, AOM, DB9, PTP, RED, MTV, EXIGO, FL, IPT, TVBZ, AB, BIB, TIK, EMP, FSC, GGN, KG, MTTP, TL, TTG, 32P, AHD, CHD, CG, OPS, TT, WIHD, BHD, U2 etc.

LOOKING FOR HIGH QUALITY SEEDBOX? EVOSEEDBOX.COM PROVIDES YOU BLAZING FAST & HIGH END SEEDBOXES | STARTING AT $5.00/MONTH!

EARN UP TO 2.00 USD PER PRIVATE TORRENT TRACKER REVIEW ON SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION. TIME’S RUNNING OUT!

15X FREE SEEDBOXES POWERED BY RAPIDSEEDBOX.COM, NOW IS THE TIME TO GET YOUR FREE SEEDBOX! [ENTER TO WIN]

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'doesn%e2%80%99t'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Invite Scene Official Information
    • Announcements
    • Suggestions and Ideas
    • Member Introductions
    • Competitions
  • Invite Scene Premium Membership
    • Make a Donation: Grab Your Premium Membership Now
  • Invite Scene VIP Giveaways & Requests
    • VIP Giveaways
    • VIP Requests
  • Invite Scene Official Store
    • Invite Scene Store: The Official Store for Private Torrent Invites
  • Invite Scene Marketplace
    • Premium Sellers Section
    • Buyer's Section
    • Trader's Section
    • Webmaster Marketplace
    • Service Offerings
    • Other Stuffs
  • Invite Scene Giveaways & Requests Section
    • Giveaways
    • Requests
  • Invite Scene Bittorrent World
    • Private Tracker News
    • BitTorrent World Discussion
    • Private Tracker Help
    • Tracker Reviews
    • Open Trackers
  • Invite Scene SeedBox Forum
    • Exclusive SeedBox Sellers Section
    • SeedBox Sellers Section
    • SeedBox Reviews
    • SeedBox Discussions
  • Making Money
    • Monetizing Techniques
    • Crypto Currency
    • Free Money Making Ebooks
  • Webmasters
    • Website Construction
  • Invite Scene General Topics
    • The Lounge
    • Movies, TV, and Videos
    • Melody, Harmony, Rhythm, and MP3
    • General PC Chat and Help
    • Security Hive
    • Guides and Tutorials
    • Gamers Hangout
    • The Graphic Design
  • Invite Scene Deal Disputes & Limitations
    • Deal Disputes
    • Archives

Categories

  • Bug Tracker
  • Suggestions Tracker

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


Google+ Hangouts


Yahoo Messenger


Skype


Discord


AIM


ICQ


Interests

Found 4 results

  1. A federal court in Georgia has quashed a broad DMCA subpoena which required local Internet provider CBeyond to reveal the identities of alleged BitTorrent pirates. The magistrate judge ruled that ISPs don't have to hand over personal information as they are not storing any infringing material themselves. Hired by prominent clients such as Warner Bros. and BMG, Rightscorp began sending DMCA subpoenas to dozens of smaller local ISPs in the United States last year. Unlike regular subpoenas these are not reviewed by a judge and only require a signature from the court clerk. This practice is questionable because these type of subpoenas are generally not applicable to file-sharing cases. Despite these concerns dozens of ISPs have complied with the requests, identifying their customers, who would then have received settlement demands for their alleged wrongdoing. CBeyond, owned by Birch Communication, is one of the few ISPs that decided not to hand over customer data without a fight. The ISP filed a motion to quash the subpoena arguing that Rightscorp is on a piracy fishing expedition, while misleading the court. One of the main arguments was that the DMCA doesn’t allow copyright holders to identify file-sharers. These type of subpoenas would only apply to services that actually host infringing material. The Court agreed with this assessment and has quashed the subpoena (pdf). As a result, the subscribers don’t have to be identified. “CBeyond contends that the section does not apply to service providers that act only as a conduit for data transferred between other parties and that do not store data. The court agrees,†Magistrate Judge Janet King writes. The Judge noted that the applicable subpoena power of the DMCA indeed only applies to services that store content. This excludes ISPs who only transmit customer data. Rightscorp had argued that the subpoenas are necessary because otherwise copyright holders will not be able to stop and deter infringers. However, Judge King held that Congress should rewrite the law if this is the case, citing an earlier District Court ruling. “It is the province of Congress, not the courts, to decide whether to rewrite the DMCA in order to make it fit a new and unforeseen internet architecture and accommodate fully the varied permutations of competing interests that are inevitably implicated by such new technology.†In addition to quashing the subpoena CBeyond also asked the court to sanction Rightscorp, but this request was denied. While the order is good news for the affected subscribers, the case isn’t over yet. Rightscorp has filed objections to the order of the Magistrate Judge and wants it overturned. For now, however, Rightscorp’s efforts to target smaller ISPs with DMCA subpoenas has been stopped in its tracks. The company filed its latest subpoena several months ago and is unlikely to file more before the pending cases are resolved. http://torrentfreak.com/isp-doesnt-have-to-expose-pirating-subscribers-judge-rules-150203/
  2. It’s always worth being nice to people who work in retail, because one of those people might just have a secret past as a black ops commando and a hunger for vigilante justice. That’s the case with Robert McCall (Denzel Washington), a calm-voiced Homemart employee with OCD who made a promise to his wife that he’d never go back to his old life of violence. For sadistic mob boss Teddy (Martin Csokas), however, Robert is willing to make an exception. The Equalizer, directed by Antoine Fuqua (Olympus Has Fallen) is loosely based on the 1980s TV show of the same name, and Sony is so confident in its potential that a sequel is already in development. If this goes ahead, with Washington’s involvement, it will mark the first time that the star has ever appeared in a direct sequel to one of his movies. First comes the task of getting people into the theaters forThe Equalizer, however, and so a new minute-long trailer for the movie has been released, which also offers a preview of upcoming single “Guts Over Fear†by Eminem and Sia, which is featured in the film. The trailer includes a few new clips, including a scene where Robert is asked by his curious colleagues about his life before Homemart. To top things off, there is an obligatory shot of Washington walking away from an explosion in slow motion. The Equalizer also stars Chloë Grace Moretz as Teri, an underage sex worker whom Robert meets during one of his usual late-night visits to his favorite diner, and who inadvertently draws him into a vigilante mission against the Russian mafia. The screenplay was penned by The Expendables 2 writer Richard Wenk. For more details about the story and production of The Equalizer, don’t forget to check out Screen Rant’s set visit report, as well as our interviews with producerTodd Black, director Antoine Fuqua and star Denzel Washington. Let us know in the comments if the combination of fast-paced action and the sweet sound of Eminem’s voice in this latest trailer have convinced you to check out The Equalizer in theaters next month. The Equalizer hits theaters September 26, 2014. http://screenrant.com/equalizer-trailer-preview-denzel-washington/
  3. New research by economist Koleman Strumpf shows that there is no significant effect of movie piracy on box office revenues. This conclusion is based on data from 150 blockbuster movies that were released over a period of six years, using the popular Hollywood exchange as an indication for the revenue impact. Research into online piracy comes in all shapes and sizes, often with equally mixed results. Often the main question is whether piracy is hurting sales. A new study conducted by economist Koleman Strumpf is one of the most comprehensive on the subject so far. Drawing on data from a popular BitTorrent tracker and revenue projections from the Hollywood Stock Exchange he researches how the release of a pirated movie affects expected box office income. The research covers 150 of the most popular films that were released over a period of seven years, and the findings reveal that the release of pirated films on file-sharing sites doesn’t directly hurt box office revenue. “There is no evidence in my empirical results of file-sharing having a significant impact on theatrical revenue,†Strumpf tells TorrentFreak in a comment. “My best guess estimate is that file sharing reduced the first month box office by $200 million over 2003-2009, which is only three tenths of a percent of what movies actually earned. I am unable to reject the hypothesis that there is no impact at all of file-sharing on revenues.†So while there is a small negative effect, this is limited to one tenth of a percent and not statistically significant. Interestingly, the data also reveals that movie leaks shortly before the premiere have a small positive impact on expected revenues. This suggests that file-sharing may serve as a form of promotion. “One consistent result is that file-sharing arrivals shortly before the theatrical opening have a modest positive effect on box office revenue. One explanation is that such releases create greater awareness of the film. This is also the period of heaviest advertising,†Strumpf notes. One of the advantages of this study compared to previous research is that it measures the direct effect of a movie leak on projected box office revenues. Previous studies mostly compared early versus late leaks, which is less accurate and may be influenced by other factors. “For example, suppose studios added extra security to big budget movies which then have a delayed arrival to file-sharing networks. Then even if file-sharing has no impact at all, one would find that delayed arrival on file-sharing leads to higher revenues,†Strumpf tells us. Another upside of the research lies in the statistical precision. The data includes thousands of daily observations and relatively precise estimates, something lacking in most previous studies. The downside, on the other hand, is that the expected box office impact is estimated from the Hollywood Stock Exchange. While this has shown to be a good predictor for actual revenues, it’s not a direct measurement. In any case, the paper suggests that file-sharing might not be the biggest threat the movie industry is facing. Even if the negative effects were twice as big as the data suggests, it would still be less than the $500 million Hollywood spent on the MPAA’s anti-piracy efforts during the same period. http://torrentfreak.com/filesharing-doesnt-hurt-box-office-revenue-research-finds-140715/
  4. The American Bar Association has released a detailed white paper advising the Government on how to tackle online piracy. The lawyers recommend several SOPA-like anti-piracy measures including injunctions against companies hosting pirate sites. At the same time, however, they advise against suing file-sharers as that would be ineffective or even counterproductive. For more than a decade copyright holders and the U.S. Government have been trying to find the silver bullet to beat piracy. This week the American Bar Association joined the discussion with a 113-page white paper. With their “call for action†the lawyers encourage Congress to draft new anti-piracy legislation and promote voluntary agreements between stakeholders. Among the options on the table is the filing of lawsuits against individual file-sharers, something the RIAA did extensively in the past. Interestingly, the lawyers advise against this option as it’s unlikely to have an impact on current piracy rates. According to the lawyers these type of lawsuits are also financially ineffective, oftentimes costing more than they bring in. In addition, they can create bad PR for the copyright holders involved. “While it is technically possible for trademark and copyright owners to proceed with civil litigation against the consuming public who [...] engage in illegal file sharing, campaigns like this have been expensive, do not yield significant financial returns, and can cause a public relations problem for the plaintiff in addressing its consuming public,†the lawyers write. “The [American Bar Association] does not believe that legislative action directly targeting consumers would prove effective in reducing piracy or counterfeiting at this time,†the white paper adds. While the above may be true for any of the cases that go to trial, various copyright trolls might tend to disagree as they have shown that targeting file-sharers can be quite lucrative. Pirates shouldn’t be too quick to cheer on the lawyers though, as the white paper also contains some pretty draconian suggestions. The American Bar Association says that future legislation should target infringing websites, and it names The Pirate Bay as an example. Since site owners are often unknown and therefore hard to prosecute in America, they advise a series of more indirect tactics. The lawyers are in favor of a “follow the money†principle where anti-piracy measures are targeted at strangling the finances of pirate sites. They call for legislation that makes it easier to cut off advertising, and to seize funds through banks or payment processors. In addition, the white paper calls for new legislation that would allow copyright holders to obtain injunctions against the hosting companies of pirate sites. The American Bar Association also considered similar injunctions against domain registrars and search engines, but it couldn’t reach agreement on these issues. Overall copyright holders will be pleased to see the recommendations put forward in the white paper, but it’s doubtful whether lawmakers will be quick pick them up. Several of the suggestions were previously listed in the SOPA and PIPA bills, so if these are ever drafted into legislation Congress can expect a lot of public backlash. http://torrentfreak.com/suing-file-sharers-doesnt-work-lawyers-warn-140713/