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Found 26 results

  1. Hello all, i was wondering what are the most wanted trackers to get an invite for. i'm asking this so i can see if i have those invites and maybe i can post some here every now and then. Elise NOTE: this is not a request thread but just a post to see what tracker invites are wanted.
  2. After the seized Megaupload and Megavideo domains ran malicious ads last month, there is more Mega domain strangeness to report. Various domain names which previously belonged to Kim Dotcom and his companies have expired and are now listed for sale, or were sold already. When Kim Dotcom’s mansion was raided early 2012, the U.S. Government targeted various domain names that were linked to the “Mega conspiracy.†While Megaupload and Megavideo were the most prominent targets, the indictment also listed megapix.com, megacar.com, megabackup.com and various other “Mega†domains. All the above sites were pulled offline as a result of the raids, and Megaupload.com and Megavideo.com displayed a banner informing visitors that the sites were under investigation. As reported previously, the banners vanished after the U.S. Department of Justice made a mistake, which also caused the seized Megaupload and Megavideo domains to run malicious ads. After uncovering these problems with the Megaupload and Megavideo domains, we noticed something else strange. The domain name Megabackup.com was no longer listed as seized. In fact, the domain is now in use by another company that offers backup solutions, similar to what Megaupload planned. Baffled by this finding, we contacted the company behind the new backup service. They informed us that they are in no way affiliated with Kim Dotcom, Megaupload or its former employees. “We are an independent software startup with no affiliation to MegaUpload whatsoever,†a company spokesperson said. Instead, the new Megabackup simply bought the domain name through a broker after it had expired. “We have acquired this domain name through a reseller platform called ‘Sedo’ about a year ago, simply because this name looked interesting and suitable for the backup software we make.†Megabackup is not the only domain that expired. The same happened to megacar.com, megagogo.com and megapix.com. The latter is currently on sale for a cool $35,000. HugeDomains, the company currently selling Megagogo.com, informed us that they scooped up the domain after it had expired. “When the domain was not renewed by the owner after expiration, HugeDomains acquired the domain when it became publicly available on January 22, 2015,†the company informed us. So has the U.S. Department of Justice made another mistake by letting these domains slip out of their hands? Well, not so fast. While the domain names are all linked to Megaupload and mentioned in the indictment, those on sale were not officially seized unlike many others. This means that anyone could have picked them up, which has also happened to Kim Dotcom’s kimpire.com domain. Commenting on the situation Dotcom informs us that the domains were not supposed to expire. “This should not have happened,†he says, adding that someone else in his team handled the registrations. https://torrentfreak.com/kim-dotcoms-seized-mega-domains-are-now-for-sale-150613/
  3. It's taken more than two years for Swedish authorities to seize two key Pirate Bay domains but over in the United States the process is dramatically quicker. A TV company has just achieved similar aims against 11 'pirate' streaming domains after being granted a comprehensive ex parte restraining order by a Florida court. One the biggest piracy-related stories of the year broke this week after Swedish authorities succeeded in their quest to take over two key Pirate Bay domains. The court order, handed down Tuesday, will see ThePirateBay.se and PirateBay.se fall under the control of the Swedish government, provided no appeal is filed in the coming weeks. It’s been a long and drawn out process but given the site’s history, one with an almost inevitable outcome. Over in the United States and spurred on by ‘rogue’ sites such as TPB, much attention has been focused on depriving ‘pirate’ sites of their essential infrastructure, domains included. Just last week the MPAA and RIAA appeared before the House Judiciary Committee’s Internet subcommittee complaining that ICANN isn’t doing enough to deal with infringing domains. Of course, having ICANN quickly suspend domains would be convenient, but entertainment industry groups aren’t completely helpless. In fact, yet another complaint filed in the United States by TV company ABS-CBN shows how easily it is to take control of allegedly infringing domains. The architect of several recent copyright infringement complaints, in its latest action ABS-CBN requested assistance from the United States District Court for the Southern District of Florida. The TV company complained that eleven sites (listed below) have been infringing its rights by offering content without permission. To protect its business moving forward ABS-CBN requested an immediate restraining order and after an ex parte hearing, District Court Judge William P. Dimitrouleas was happy to oblige. In an order (pdf) handed down May 15 (one day after the complaint was filed) Judge Dimitrouleas acknowledges that the sites unlawfully “advertised, promoted, offered for distribution, distributed or performed†copyrighted works while infringing on ABS-CBN trademarks. He further accepted that the sites were likely to continue their infringement and cause “irreparable injury†to the TV company in the absence of protection by the Court. Granting a temporary order (which will become preliminary and then permanent in the absence of any defense by the sites in question) the Judge restrained the site operators from further infringing on ABS-CBN copyrights and trademarks. However, it is the domain element that provokes the most interest. In addition to ordering the sites’ operators not to transfer any domains until the Court advises, Judge Dimitrouleas ordered the registrars of the domains to transfer their certificates to ABS-CBN’s counsel. Registrars must then lock the domains and inform their registrants what has taken place. Furthermore, the Whois privacy protection services active on the domains and used to conceal registrant identities are ordered to hand over the site operators’ personal details to ABS-CBN so that the TV company is able to send a copy of the restraining order. If no active email address is present in Whois records, ABS-CBN is allowed to contact the defendants via their websites. Once this stage is complete the domain registrars are ordered to transfer the domains to a new registrar of ABS-CBN’s choosing. However, if the registrars fail to act within 24 hours, the TLD registries (.COM etc) must take overriding action within five days. The Court also ordered ABS-CBN’s registrar to redirect any visitors to the domains to a specific URL (http://servingnotice.com/BL4G47/index.html) which is supposed to contain a copy of the order. At the time of writing, however, that URL is non-functional. Also of interest is how the Court locks down attempts to get the sites running again. In addition to expanding the restraining order to any new domains the site operators may choose to move to, the Court grants ABS-CBN access to Google Webmaster Tools so that the company may “cancel any redirection of the domains that have been entered there by Defendants which redirect traffic to the counterfeit operations to a new domain name or website.†The domains affected are: freepinoychannel.com, lambingan.to, pinoymovie.to, pinoynetwork.to, pinoytambayan-replay.com, pinoytambayantv.com, tambaytayo.com, tvnijuan.net, phstream.com, streampinoy.info and tambayanatin.com. Despite the order having been issued last Thursday, at the time of writing all but one of the domains remains operational. Furthermore, and in an interesting twist, pinoymovie.to and pinoynetwork.to have already skipped to fresh domains operated by none other than the Swedish administered .SE registry. https://torrentfreak.com/pirate-domain-seizures-are-easy-in-the-united-states-150521/
  4. Encrypted Internet traffic is surging according to data published by Canadian broadband management company Sandvine. A new report reveals that 25 percent of the encrypted downstream traffic in North America is consumed by BitTorrent transfers, second only to YouTube. In recent years it has become apparent that BitTorrent users are increasingly searching for options to hide their download footprints. Thus far, however, there was little information available on how much of all encrypted traffic is file-sharing related. A new report published by Sandvine now provides some insight into this. To find out how much of all Internet traffic is encrypted, and what the most popular sources are, last month the company gathered data in collaboration with a North American fixed access network. The findings reveal that nearly 30% of all downstream traffic is encrypted. The majority of the traffic remains unencrypted (65%), and the small remainder has yet to be identified. Looking at the individual sources of encrypted traffic we see that YouTube currently accounts for most of it. More than 11% of all downstream traffic comes from encrypted YouTube data, which is nearly 40% of all encrypted traffic. BitTorrent transfers come in second place with 7.2% of the total downstream traffic, which is good for nearly a quarter of all encrypted data. It’s worth noting that the report only looks at downstream traffic. BitTorrent’s share of upstream traffic is usually much higher, so the total percentage of all encrypted traffic will be well over 25 percent. Another fact worth mentioning is that before YouTube made the transition to support secure data transfers, BitTorrent was the number one source of encrypted traffic according to Sandvine. With Netflix poised to move to encryption by default, the relative share of BitTorrent will probably drop even further in the near future. Absolute traffic is expected to keep growing, however. In response to various anti-piracy initiatives and monitoring schemes around the world, BitTorrent users are increasingly turning to anonymizing services such as encrypted VPNs. It will be interesting to see how this trend develops during the years to come. https://torrentfreak.com/torrents-are-good-for-a-quarter-of-all-encrypted-traffic-150501/
  5. e are looking for editors to help us edit contents on new AsiaTorrents website. Rank - new Rank of editor will be visible on your account, you will have more power than V.I.P users. - You will be part of our staff team. - Opportunity to become our staff, then Moderator and finally an Admin. - access to edit every contents on the new website. Requirement - Mush have have been member of AsiaTorrent for more than a year - Must not have pissed off any of our staffs - Must enjoy and know about Asian movies, tv shows and music - Must know how to write in English. - Plus point if you know other Asian languages. Responsibilities - Edit torrents, movies, tv-shows and music contents (as per our rules). - Add missing contents like posters, actors, etc - Re-organize contents, eg: fixing wrong categories, wrong language or countries, - Add or remove tags. - blog about new releases, - build movie, tv or music collections, How to Apply - Let us know about you, we dont need to know your personal details. - let us know your experiences. - Let us know how many languages you can read and write in. - Let us know how you can contribute our our community! Apply here
  6. The Pirate Bay has welcomed several moderators back on board. After initial security issues were resolved site staff have now regained access to the backend. The moderators got to work right away and have already removed hundreds of fake torrents in an effort to restore the site to its former glory. The Pirate Bay has been back online for three weeks now and most of the site’s former users have found their way back. While the notorious torrent site appeared to function normally, things were pretty hectic behind the scenes. TPB had to switch hosting providers on several occasions after being kicked out following copyright complaints. At the same time, scammers were populating the site with fake torrents and scammy comments. Since TPB decided to restart without a moderator crew for security reasons, most fake torrents remained online for days, driving downloaders to malware and other malicious content. Locking out the moderators initially led to mutiny among the staff and concerns among users, but this week several long-time moderators came back on board. Close to a dozen moderators now have access to the site again and they started cleaning up the place right away. Spammer accounts were banned and hundreds of fake files have already been deleted. “I don’t know how many torrents have been removed so far, but it is in the hundreds. Some fakers had eight or nine pages under their account,†TPB moderator Agricola tells TF. The moderators describe the site as a “crap heap†and there’s still plenty of work to be done. However, for security reasons, no new “helpers†will be allowed to join. “No new staff will be recruited, so the helper status will be gone. The staff will only consist of moderators,†Agricola says. For the time being no new accounts can be registered, which makes the clean up a little easier. Spammers will have to use old existing accounts and these will become harder to find. Earlier this week TPB operator Winston told us that registrations will eventually be opened as well, but not before everything else is running smoothly. With the moderators back on board the site will slowly and steadily return to what it was before the raid, marking the end of some of the most challenging weeks in the site’s history. http://torrentfreak.com/pirate-bay-mods-are-back-on-board-for-massive-cleanup-150220/
  7. There are rumours all around that, Zhou was sentenced to 5 years in prison and fined 1,000,000 yuan also his friends are sentenced to prison from 3-5 years which is a terrible news to the lovers of CHDBits and HDWings. I admit that CHDBits and HDwings are two great HD trackers but this is not the end of the world if you seek for a new HD tracker. You can always contact me for the new alternatives. Final words, rest in peace CHDBits and HDWings... Wolfie P.S. These are rumours will most probably be true in the following hours/days.
  8. Strangely unreported by mainstream media, there is a major revision of the copyright monopoly underway in the European Union. And the person in charge, Julia Reda, is a Pirate Party representative. The tide is turning. For years – nay, for decades – net activists and freedom-of-speech activists have been fighting against the copyright industry’s corrupt initiatives. In country after country, the copyright industry was practically calling out for mail-order legislation, and receiving it every time. The collateral damage to liberties has been immense, and has spilled far outside the net. In the US, people are complaining that copyright monopoly law is now unintentionally preventing them to modify items they legally own, such as cars or games consoles. They’re absolutely wrong: that was the exact intention with the most recent round of revisions to copyright monopoly law – to limit property rights and to lock people out of their own possessions. (The copyright monopoly is, and has always been, a limitation on property rights.) Further, that collateral damage includes making messengers (“intermediariesâ€) liable for any damages caused by a message they carry, unless they immediately take sites offline – which they would of course rather do, rather than risking immense lawsuits. The messenger immunity was gutted around the turn of the century, by the EUCD and the DMCA alike. “Notice-and-takedown†has been abused by everybody and their corporate brother, up to and including the oil company Neste Oil who attacked a Greenpeace protest site by threatening the Internet provider of Greenpeace, thereby killing the protest site. As activists fought – and won! – against software patent monopolies in Europe in 2005, it became clear that we couldn’t fight one bad thing after another, never having the initiative, always being on the defense against onslaught from corporate mail-order legislation. For every exhausting victory, there were nine bad laws being passed in the shadows. We had to go on the offense. We had to aspire to write the law ourselves, keeping corporate lobbyists firmly out of any corrupt influence. On January 1, 2006, I founded the Swedish and first Pirate Party. It’s now on its tenth year, and on its second term in the European Parliament. This term, that European Parliament is revising the copyright monopoly – definitely once, possibly twice. It starts out by evaluating what works and what doesn’t with the current set of laws on the matter. And the rapporteur for that dossier – meaning “the person writing the actual legislative document†– is Julia Reda, representative for the Pirate Party from Germany. Let’s take that again: a Pirate Party representative is writing the European Union’s official evaluation of the copyright monopoly, and listing a set of necessary changes. In 2006, did I imagine that a pirate would be writing the European Parliament’s official evaluation of how well the copyright monopoly has worked – and what needs to be changed – in the European Union, the world’s largest economy? No, I didn’t, to be honest. But neither did I expect that the Pirate Party representatives would manage to get “three strikes†schemes outlawed across all of Europe in 2009, or take a radical reform proposal (allowing file-sharing and more) into the political mainstream in 2012. When you open the floodgates of the unrepresented, things can apparently happen fast. Now, just because it’s a pirate writing the legislative document, that doesn’t mean that document is going to pass a vote in the European Parliament no matter what it contains. It needs to be negotiated to get majority support, as usual and as appropriate in a parliamentary democracy. The first of those votes is in the Legal Affairs committee on April 16, and the vote in the European Parliament as a whole is on May 20. So pirates aren’t “in chargeâ€; democracy is, as it should be. But the initiative has shifted. It is no longer solely initiated by mail-order lobbyists for corrupt incumbents who gladly sacrifice civil liberties and the entire Internet to preserve an unjust and immoral lucrative monopoly. For the first time, legislation on the matter is initiated by net liberty activists. This shift of the initiative was what we set out to accomplish ten years ago. I think it went faster than most people had expected. ABOUT THE AUTHOR Rick Falkvinge is a regular columnist on TorrentFreak, sharing his thoughts every other week. He is the founder of the Swedish and first Pirate Party, a whisky aficionado, and a low-altitude motorcycle pilot. His blog at falkvinge.net focuses on information policy. http://torrentfreak.com/in-europe-pirates-are-writing-the-copyright-law-150104/
  9. Is it a specific game? Consistent online connectivity? More Sequels? More innovative titles? After the last few days, more consistent online connectivity is certainly high on my list, but I am also looking forward to more innovative games – the kind of games that will sneak up on me and surprise me. Of course, there are a lot of sequels I am excited about as well, like The Legend of Zelda Wii U, Batman: Arkham Knight, and Halo 5.
  10. Sony will release two new Yakuza-themed custom PlayStation 4 consoles in Japan alongside the new Yakuza game, the company has announced. There's the Kazuma Kiryu Edition and the Mashima Goro Edition, both of which feature dragon artwork inspired by Yakuza tattoo design. Sony's selling them as special consoles, but the fancy design bits are laser-engraved HDD covers. They each come in either the console's Jet Black or Glacier White version and will cost ¥41,980 (which is about $350) when they're released on March 12, 2015. The special edition console will give buyers a small discount on the upcoming Yakuza Zero, a prequel to the open world crime-themed series that takes place in 1988, seven years before the events of the first Yakuza game. During its PlayStation Experience event earlier this month, Sony and Sega announced that Yakuza 5 will finally get a Western release, coming to PlayStation 3 via PSN in 2015. Sega and Sony also recently madeYakuza 4 and Yakuza: Dead Souls available to download. So far, Sony and Sega didn't announce plans to release Yakuza Zero and the special edition PS4s outside of Japan. The companies also haven't said whether Yakuza: Ishin, the first PS4 game in the series, will get a Western release.
  11. Jennifer Lopez has to deal with her friends playing Cupid. The 45-year-old's divorce from Marc Anthony was finalised earlier this year and her relationship with dancer Casper Smart ended in June, amid rumours he'd cheated on her with a transsexual model. She has two other failed marriages behind her and is now content just focusing on herself. "My friends are constantly trying to set me up but I'm just not there right now. It's not something that's a priority. I have gone from relationship to relationship but, at the end of the day, I am not ashamed of the path I have taken or the lessons I have learned," she is quoted as saying by British newspaper The Mirror. 'I am who I am and I am human. I do what feels right in the moment. And right now it feels good to just be on my own and have some 'I love Jennifer' time, which I haven't done a lot in my life." The star has six-year-old twins Max and Emme with Marc and has been spending time with the kids in the wake of her latest split. She still believes in love, but calls being a mother her "number-one priority" right now. Jennifer suffered a shock last month when she and friend Leah Remini were involved in a car accident, which saw a drunk driver slam into the rear of their vehicle. She opened up about the incident, recalling the fear she felt. 'We were only five feet from the restaurant when a guy just slammed into the back of us. I swear I thought a boulder had fallen on top of us. It was so scary and I got out of the car and started yelling and screaming because I was so frightened the kids could have been hurt. It was a very scary situation and my daughter was sobbing," she shuddered. 'The guy was driving drunk and got arrested. But we were all fine. The kids were all in the backseat with their seatbelts on, thank goodness.' Add Rep and Leave a feedback Reputation is the green button in the down right corner on my post
  12. Restoration process now underway; Imminent patch will help activate more online features; No update on PS Plus edition. Driveclub servers are "building a steady increase in performance", according to its developer. The performance increases follow a string of connection problems that affected players after the game shipped last week. Evolution Studios, the developer responsible for Driveclub's buggy netcode, has been persistently communicative during its disastrous week of connection problems and server timeouts. But late on Monday, the studio appeared to have turned a corner, claiming that an increasing number of players are now able to access the title. "Continual upgrades to the Driveclub servers are building a steady increase in performance, meaning that we're getting more and more players connected," the studio wrote. As an immediate response to the online problems last week, Evolution closed some of Driveclub's online features and postponed the free PS Plus edition. While there is still no new release date announced for the PS Plus version, the developer said another server update would arrive by Wednesday that would begin the process of switching on more online features. "We are sorry that we don't have more concrete news to share right now, but please be patient. We will have more information for you tomorrow," the studio added. Throughout the past seven days, Driveclub director Paul Rustchynsky has been actively addressing fans on Twitter, explaining that it was the game's buggy netcode that resulted in the server woes. He added that the team has not ruled out compensating those affected by the connection problems. Add Rep and Leave a feedback Reputation is the green button in the down right corner on my post
  13. The parent company of luxury watch maker Cartier is trying to expand the grounds on which websites can be censored in the UK. In an action against the country's leading ISPs, Richemont International is seeking an injunction to have sites displaying pirated brand logos blocked at the ISP level. The UK is now one of the easiest countries in the world to obtain a website blocking injunction on copyright grounds. While much work had to be done initially, having websites filtered out by the leading ISPs is now a streamlined and largely closed-door practice. Child protection issues aside, up until now it has been copyright holders leading the charge for websites to be blacked out. Dozens of sites are affected, with the majority of the world’s leading file-sharing portals now inaccessible by regular means. If the parent company of luxury watchmaker Cartier has its way, soon a new and potentially more widespread wave of website blockades will begin. Compagnie Financière Richemont S.A. owns several well-known luxury brands including Cartier and Mont Blanc. For some time it has been trying to pressure sites offering counterfeits into closing down, but without success. Mirroring the tactics being employed by the studios and recording labels, Richemont has essentially given up on that approach and has decided to take legal action ISPs instead. In March 2014, Richemont reportedly wrote to the country’s leading ISPs (Sky, TalkTalk, BT, Virgin Meda, EE, Telefonica (O2)) complaining that third party sites were engaged in illegal activity and were displaying pirated logos which infringe on Richemont trademarks. In May the ISPs responding by telling the company that it had not done enough to have the sites close down, such as contacting their webhosts to have service discontinued. The ISPs also complained that by blocking the websites there was a chance that legitimate trade could be affected. An unfair financial burden for the ISPs was also a probability, particularly given the number of likely copycat requests if the application was successful. While it appears the ISPs are putting up more of a fight in this case than they did with entertainment company blocking requests, those were actioned under copyright law where injunctions against service providers are catered for. UK trademark law has no such direct provision. The case, which is now being heard at the High Court, has attracted the attention of the Open Rights Group. ORG says it takes no view on the merits of the case, but has been given permission to intervene in order to raise awareness over the possibility that third party interests could be affected if blocking injunctions are granted. “As the court is being asked to extend the circumstances in which blocking orders are granted, it’s vital that the wider public interest is taken into account. We hope that our intervention will help ensure that future claimants cannot use blocking orders to restrict legitimate activity or free speech,†says ORG Legal Director Elizabeth Knight. ORG says its concern is that if Geneva-based Richemont are successful, further applications could be made which are contrary to public interest. These could include blocking sites that use logos to legitimately criticize or parody well known brands “Court blocking orders may also affect commercial third parties who have no involvement in any alleged infringement – for example law abiding businesses whose products appear on websites alongside those of companies involved in infringing activity,†the group says. It remains to be seen how smoothly the process pans out, but there could be interesting side effects. Entertainment industry companies and artists also own plenty of trademarks that are often displayed on ‘pirate’ websites. If the trademark route proves a simple one, that could end up being their chosen path for future blocking requests. Mr Justice Arnold has requested submissions on how third party rights could be affected if injunctions are granted. ORG will ensure he gets the message. source: torrentfreak
  14. A new study published by research firm KPMG reveals that only 16% of the most popular and critically acclaimed films are available via Netflix and other on-demand subscription services. The study, which reveals that availability through other platforms is excellent, is praised by the MPAA, but the big elephant in the room is conveniently ignored. There is little doubt that, in the United States, Netflix has become the standard for watching movies on the Internet. The subscription service is responsible for a third of all Internet traffic during peak hours, dwarfing that of online piracy and other legal video platforms. It’s safe to assume that Netflix is the best and most convenient alternative to piracy at this point. That is, if the service carries the movies people want to see. This appears to be a problem. Research firm KPMG has just released a new study that looks at the online availability of the 808 most popular and critically acclaimed films. The study was commissioned by NBC Universal and praised by the MPAA, presumably to dispel the argument that many people pirate because they don’t have the option to watch some films legally. “This first-of-its-kind report analyzed the availability of 808 different film titles over 34 major online video distribution services and found that 94 percent of the films were available on at least one service,†MPAA’s Chris Dodd commented on the study. The MPAA is right that most of the movies are available through online stores and rental services. However, the Hollywood group conveniently ignores the lacking availability on popular subscription platforms which services such as Netflix and Hulu use. This is not a minor oversight as the study finds that availability of top films on Netflix and other subscription services is very low. Although KPMG decided not to mention it in the executive summary of the report, the findings show that only 16% of the films are available through on-demand subscription services (SOVD). Availability of the top films http://torrentfreak.com/images/topfilmavail.png The above sheds a different light on the availability argument. Because, what good is it if 94 percent of the films are available online, but (at least) 84% are missing from the most-used movie service? After all, most people prefer to get their movies in one place as it’s not very convenient to use a few dozen services to get your movie fix. Of course this is not an excuse for people to go out and download films without permission, and we have to admit that a lot of progress has been made on the availability side in recent years. However, Hollywood can definitely learn from the music industry, where most of the popular content is available through subscription services. From the availability point of view there’s another issue worth pointing out. The most pirated titles are usually recent releases, and these are generally not available, not even through iTunes, Amazon or rental services. This is also illustrated in the KPMG report which shows that 100% of the top 2012 films are available online, compared to 77% of the 2013 releases. It’s probably safe to say that the majority of all pirated downloads are of films that are not yet legally available. In other words, there’s still plenty of improvement possible.
  15. Company's first wearable device launches in early 2015, and it requires an iPhone. Today during a special press event, Apple not only revealed new iPhones, but also a smartwatch product line. The Apple Watch is the most personal device Apple has ever created, CEO Tim Cook said, as reported by GameSpot sister site CNET. You can follow along with CNET's liveblog for up-to-the-second details about the device. "Because you wear it, we invented new intimate ways to connect and communicate directly from your wrist," Cook said, labeling the Apple Watch a "breakthrough" product. The Apple Watch represents the company's first wearable device. Other major personal electronics makers, including Sony, Motorola, Samsung, and LG, already have smartwatches available on the market. The Apple Watch line will include three main models: Apple Watch, Apple Watch Sport, and Apple Watch Edition. A variety of bands--six in all--will be available, including stainless steel and leather straps. These are interchangeable (using a proprietary strap design), meaning you're not locked into one style or another. The device has a built-in heart rate sensor and gyroscope, as well as haptic feedback. The Apple Watch can also determine the difference between a tap and a press, and features wireless, inductive charging. In terms of software, Siri makes the jump to the Apple Watch, and there are also maps and photo apps. Apple Watches will start at $349 when the product line launches in early 2015. In addition, Apple Watches require an iPhone because the two devices have been designed to work together. You won't need to buy a new iPhone 6 to use the watch, however, as Apple Watches are also compatible with iPhone 5, iPhone 5S, and iPhone 5c models. Wall Street is responding positively to today's Apple news, as the company's stock is up around 3 percent today to $101.34. Add Rep and Leave a feedback Reputation is the green button in the down right corner on my post
  16. In a submission to the Australian Government on the issue of online piracy, the BBC indicates that ISPs should be obliged to monitor their customers' activities. Service providers should become suspicious that customers could be pirating if they use VPN-style services and consume a lot of bandwidth, the BBC says. After cutting its teeth as a domestic broadcaster, the BBC is spreading its products all around the globe. Shows like Top Gear have done extremely well overseas and the trend of exploiting other shows in multiple territories is set to continue. As a result the BBC is now getting involved in the copyright debates of other countries, notably Australia, where it operates four subscription channels. Following submissions from Hollywood interests and local ISPs, BBC Worldwide has now presented its own to the Federal Government. Its text shows that the corporation wants new anti-piracy measures to go further than ever before. The BBC begins by indicating a preference for a co-operative scheme, one in which content owners and ISPs share responsibility to “reduce and eliminate†online copyright infringement. Educating consumers on both the impact of piracy and where content can be obtained legally online would be supported by improved availability of official offerings. After providing general piracy statistics, the BBC turn to the recent leaking of the new series of Doctor Who to file-sharing networks which acted “as a spoiler†to the official global TV premiere. “Despite the BBC dedicating considerable resources to taking down and blocking access to these Doctor Who materials, there were almost 13,000 download attempts of these materials from Australian IP addresses in the period between their unauthorized access and the expiration of the usual catch-up windows,†the BBC write. So what can be done? In common with all rightsholder submissions so far, the BBC wants to put pressure on ISPs to deal with their errant subscribers via a graduated response scheme of educational messages backed up by punitive measures for the most persistent of infringers. “ISPs should warn any alleged copyright infringers through a graduated notification system that what they are doing is illegal and, at the same time, educate them about the law, the importance of copyright to funding content and services they enjoy and where they can access the material they want legally. However. if the consumers do not abide by the notifications then more serious action may need to be taken,†the BBC note. Those sanctions could lead to a throttling of a users’ Internet connection but should not normally lead to a complete disconnection. However, the BBC doesn’t rule that out, adding that such measures could be employed “in the most serious and egregious circumstances, as is the case in the United States.†While little in the foregoing presents much of a surprise, the BBC goes further than any other rightsholder submission thus far in suggesting that ISPs should not only forward notices, but also spy on their customers’ Internet usage habits. VPNs are pirate tools “Since the evolution of peer-to-peer software protocols to incorporate decentralized architectures, which has allowed users to download content from numerous host computers, the detection and prosecution of copyright violations has become a complex task. This situation is further amplified by the adoption of virtual private networks (VPNs) and proxy servers by some users, allowing them to circumvent geo-blocking technologies and further evade detection,†the BBC explain. “It is reasonable for ISPs to be placed under an obligation to identify user behavior that is ‘suspicious’ and indicative of a user engaging in conduct that infringes copyright. Such behavior may include the illegitimate use by Internet users of IP obfuscation tools in combination with high download volumes.†While the BBC goes on to state that “false positives†would need to be avoided in order to “safeguard the fundamental rights of consumersâ€, none of this will sit well with Internet service providers or the public. Throwing around accusations of illegal activity based on the existence of an encrypted tunnel and high bandwidth consumption is several steps beyond anything suggested before. Site blocking The BBC says it supports the blocking of overseas infringing sites at the ISP level after obtaining a court injunction. Of interest is a proposal to use a system which allows for injunctions to be modified after being issued in order to deal with sites finding ways to circumvent bans. “It is important to have the ability to get existing injunctions varied by the court when defendants reappear in different guises, a useful tool in the United Kingdom,†the BBC writes. Who foots the bill? Who pays for all of the above has been the major sticking point in all Australian negotiations thus far. The ISPs largely believe they shouldn’t have to pay for anything, but most rightsholders – the BBC included – think that the costs need to be shared. “In light of the fact that a large inducement for internet users to become customers of ISPs is to gain access to content (whether legally or illegally), it is paramount that ISPs are required to take an active role in preventing and fighting online copyright infringement by establishing and contributing meaningfully to the cost of administering some form of graduated response scheme,†the BBC concludes.
  17. It’s true: people spend more time looking at their smartphone screens nowadays than the world around them, but there’s an interesting world behind touch screens that consumes users too easily these days. A new study says that we should thank Facebook, Google, Pandora, Apple, and Yahoo for our touch screen addictions. Really. In that order. The new addicting mobile apps study, conducted by user survey company ComScore, says that Yahoo’s Finance app and Apple’s 3D Maps app place in the top 10 most-used mobile apps, but rank at the bottom of the top 10. Internet radio service Pandora, Facebook’s Instagram, and Google’s Play Store and Gmail stand in the middle. At the top of the most-used mobile apps chain stands Google’s YouTube (second place), used by 84 million users monthly, and social networking site Facebook (first place), with 115 million users monthly. Google’s search app also ranks in the most-used mobile apps list with 70 million users monthly. ComScore’s study shows that, indeed, there are five Google apps that make the most-used mobile apps list (YouTube, Gmail, Google search, Google Play, Google Maps), while Facebook has two that make the list (Facebook app, Instagram). Apple, Pandora, and Yahoo do not compete in the most-used mobile apps contest, though they provide respectable contributions in the world of tech that can’t (and shouldn’t) be overlooked. At the same time, however, some explanation should be given for these results. Google Maps, Gmail, YouTube and Google search are popular apps on both Android and iOS, but this is because Google’s search engine has been around for as long as many twenty-somethings and thirty-somethings can remember. Apple’s made Bing its default search engine in iOS 7, but a number of iOS users can’t escape the search engine dependence they’ve had with Google for many years. Google Maps is one of the best (if not the best) maps applications in the world, and Apple Maps, as improved as they may be, will need a few years (if not longer) to get where Google Maps is in its current state. Apple drummed up its own Maps app to “wean†iOS users off Google Maps, but eventually had to recommend Google Maps as an alternative maps solution after the Apple Maps Fiasco with a few “disappearing†streets and landmarks. At the same time, however, Google Maps, Apple Maps, and Gmail are utility apps – mobile apps that users need on a daily basis for directions and email. On Android, Gmail is the current default email app (compliments of Android owner Google). The same can be said for Google’s Play Store. The reason why the Play Store is so popular is because 1) there are far more Android users worldwide than iOS users, and 2) Google won’t allow other app stores onto Android. The whole reason behind why Google and Samsung arrived at a cross-licensing agreement back in February after Mobile World Congress 2014 pertains to Samsung’s Magazine UX and Google’s belief that Samsung’s Magazine UI was “hiding†Google services. In other words, there’s not much room in Android for anyone but Google. This is not to downplay the results given regarding the Play Store, but the presence of the Play Store in the top 10 apps should be put into perspective. If the iOS App Store made it into the top ten most-used mobile apps, for example, we wouldn’t be surprised. Where do users go in the mobile world to find, purchase, and download new apps, anyway? There are two confirmations that stand out in ComScore’s study. First, YouTube stands second in the most-used mobile apps on mobile – a trend that Google is looking to continue with its new YouTube Music Key and Play Music Key service that will grant users access to both Google Play’s unlimited music as well as YouTube’s offline and audio playback services (along with the original video-viewing experience) for $9.99 monthly (total). This study should prove encouraging to Google, although it’s not surprising to Android users who can’t think of any other online service that can rival YouTube. Last but never least stands Pandora as the undisputed top Internet radio service on the Web – meaning that the company’s Internet radio service has proven to be more of a hit than Spotify (its closest competitor) and iTunes Radio. Google seems interested in tackling the Internet radio arena and has acquired Songza (from what we know), but we’ve heard nothing about Songza recently. Samsung’s Milk Music Internet radio service is an excellent one, but Samsung never intended for it to be a top contender (after all, the company only allows its own smartphones and tablets to access the service). With Google taking five of the top ten slots, what’re the rest of Mountain View’s competitors to do? With Google owning Android, the most popular OS worldwide, we don’t see Google’s sweeping mobile campaign coming to an end anytime soon.
  18. A lot of this week in civil liberties has been about the riots in Ferguson, Missouri, USA. Police troops fired tear gas on a television crew. This mirrors the ongoing web censorship efforts. The governments around the world are reacting the exact same way today as they did when the printing press arrived 500 years ago. There isn’t really anything new under the sun. Then, as now, they were used to telling people what was true and what wasn’t, telling whatever story that fit whatever it was they wanted to do. “Cannabis is dangerous. Tobacco is not harmful at all. Oh, and there are weapons of mass destruction in Iraq.†When police troops in Ferguson launched tear gas grenades at a television team from Al-Jazeera, that is a symptom of the exact same thing as web censorship: governments are losing control of the story. Governments can no longer invent whatever truth that fits what they want to happen. Police firing at press is actually something very rare – even in the worst of war zones, it’s a rare occurrence that press teams are deliberately targeted, and yet, this was precisely what happened in Ferguson, USA. The reason is the exact same as for web censorship and mass surveillance: The governments and the people working for them are attacking anybody who exposes what they do, using whatever power they have to do so. Tear gas grenades against a TV crew may have been both overviolent and counterproductive, but it’s still the same thing. It’s exactly what happened when the printing press arrived, and the penalties for using a printing press – thereby circumventing the truthtellers of that time – gradually increased to the death penalty (France, 1535). Not even the death penalty worked to deter people from using the printing press to tell their version of events to the world, which more often than not contradicted the official version. The cat was out of the bag. As it is now. Governments and police still don’t understand that everybody is a broadcaster – attacking a TV crew was futile in the first place. During the initial, hopeful months of the Arab Spring, a lot of photos circulated of young people gathering for protests. What was interesting about the photos were that they were taken with mobile phones, but also that they showed a lot of other people at the protest taking photos of the same crowd at the same time with their own mobile phone. Thus, the photos of the ongoing revolution contained instructions in themselves for how to perpetuate the revolution – take pictures of crowds defying the edicts and dictums. This is why it’s so puzzling that the police even bother to give special treatment to people from television stations and newspapers. Strictly speaking, they’re not necessary to get the story out anymore, even if they still have some follower advantage for the most part. “Police are being transformed from protecting the public into protecting government from the publicâ€, as @directorblue just tweeted. That could be said about pretty much anything concerning the net, too — from oppressive applications of copyright monopoly law to strangling net innovations or giving telcos monopolies that prevent the net’s utility. The attacks on the public by police troops in Ferguson, attacks from the copyright industry against those who want a free net, and web censorship by governments are all different sides of the same story. And all of this has happened before. Last time this happened, it took 200 years of civil war to settle the dust and agree that the printing press may have been a nice invention after all. Can we please not repeat that mistake? http://torrentfreak.com/ferguson-attacks-web-censorship-parts-story-140817/
  19. As far as Beatles anniversaries go, today is a pretty cool one: It's the 45th anniversary of the day the iconic Abbey Road cover photo was shot by Iain Macmillan. In honor of that ubiquituos image, below we've rounded up some of our favorite images and moments honoring the iconic shot. Come for the Glee kids, stay for the unexpected Parent Trap clip. 1.) When Glee released two all-Beatles-music tribute episodes in 2013, they also released some homage-y cover art as well. 2.) Paul McCartney himself got in on the fun (and his own Beatles-era "Paul is Dead!" rumors") with the cover of his 1993 album. 3.) Performing live at Abbey Road Studios, this cover isn't exactly a surprise for 2006-era Kanye West. 4.) An illustrator had some fun with the Simpsons for a Nov. 2002 Rolling Stonecover. 5.) Sesame Street: Is there anything the beloved kids show hasn't lovingly spoofed? 6.) The Red Hot Chili Peppers put their own...unique...spin on Abbey Road for the cover of their 1988 release, The Abbey Road E.P. 7.) The Parent Trap: Didn't expect to see a young Lindsay Lohan on this list, did you? But a scene from the actress' earliest film role gave a knowing wink to audiences when it had her travel across the famous street among a montage of iconic places. (The fun starts at :58)
  20. Following an episode that built slowly and without much tension to its explosive conclusion, the producers of Extant took a slightly different tact with ‘Shelter’, dropping breadcrumbs and character details along the way to its own impactful ending while the threat of a raiding ISEA SWAT team lingered in the background to provide ample tension. Panicked and on the run, Molly and her family have fled their home on the say-so of Sam (Camryn Manheim), Molly’s trusted confidant and Doctor. Given little time to prepare, Molly (Halle Berry) and John (Goran Visnjic) flee without grabbing their passports or cleaning out their bank accounts. John’s decision to disable Ethan’s tracking chip seems to be the only precaution that the couple takes as they make their way to a remote island where Molly’s father, Quinn (Louis Gossett Jr.) lives. We sense tension between Molly and Quinn at the start, but it seems typical – she doesn’t see her father enough and he seems a little cool to her husband. Quinn is warm to Ethan, though, treating him as any grandfather would treat his grandson. There is no distance because the boy is a humanech. At least not at first. While on the island, John voices his disbelief over the situation that they find themselves in. He doesn’t understand why the ISEA would so aggressively look to lock Molly down, but of course, neither he or Molly have a good idea of what is happening behind the scenes with Yasumoto (Hiroyuki Sanada). Neither did we, save for the vague sense of evil that the man put off when on-screen, but in this episode, we got a bit more confirmation as Yasumoto’s desperation increased following a lab experiment on a substance that had come from a meteor killed one of the scientists working on the project as Yasumoto looked on. “Life sustaining substanceâ€, Yasumoto calls it while talking to Sparks (Michael O’Neill), kicking things into high gear when he tells him to take care of Sam and bring Molly in to extract her baby, setting up a mobile operating room for the grim task. To Sam’s credit, even while in custody, she is still dedicated to Molly’s aid, dumping a vile of Molly’s blood into the toilet to cover for her, but after she is discovered and her brother is threatened by Sparks, Sams tune begrudgingly changes and she picks a new side. I really thought that Sparks would eliminate Sam, but this allows the conspiracy to deepen and it keeps the very talented Ms. Manheim on a show that could use more standout supporting performances, not less. While Sam is betraying her friend, Molly and John (and for a moment, Marcus) are at her father’s house running a DNA sample to determine exactly what it is that is inside of her while Quinn uses Ethan’s abilities to win a bar game (and a fistful of dollars) down by the docks before the boy throws the game after misunderstanding something that Quinn said. This is where we start to get a better idea of Quinn and Molly’s relationship and why there is distance between them. Quinn is, simply put, ugly toward the boy when he loses, something that may have manifested itself because Quinn took a drink at the bar. When Quinn returns to the house with Ethan – who had seemingly run off – Molly quickly asks her father if he was drinking, filling in those last remaining blanks. There’s a bit of nuance to Gossett’s performance. He doesn’t carry on or scream, he’s just terse as he starts to treat the boy like a thing and not something with emotions and that carries over when John and Molly panic over Ethan’s disappearance. Quinn just isn’t as worried as one would expect, but it’s a subtle difference. He doesn’t go inside to watch TV or crack jokes about the only danger to the boy being that he might get rusted – that line is reserved for the cop that John punches while they search for the boy, a dumb decision that takes John out of the “fieldâ€, as it were. As we see almost immediately, Ethan didn’t run off, he was kidnapped by the ISEA agents who had been lingering on the island, watching and waiting to strike. Once in custody, Ethan is rushed through the woods until the agents find a clearing and disable him with some kind of prod, laying the boy on the dirt before retreating so that he could be used as bait. Why all that was necessary and why the agents couldn’t just rush in to grab Molly is not known. If we’re being cynical, we can say that it’s a hollow act to add a little false jeopardy to the show (logic dictates that nothing bad and everlasting will happen to Ethan, since this is a network TV show and that would be too profoundly sad to move off of in quick order) and a chance to leak that bit about Molly and Quinn’s relationship, but in that Ethan’s recovery seems to occupy a significant chunk of next week’s episode, perhaps we’ll learn the answer next week. We’re also hopeful that we’ll finally learn about what it is that is inside Molly’s stomach and what it, emphatically, means to Yasumoto, because after seeing Molly demonstrate a bit of psychokinesis this week as she lay trapped in a hospital bed, a skill that enabled her to momentarily break free before stumbling into the operating room, we are now more curious than ever before. I’m also eager to see if this show is going to go to some grand place on the sci-fi wheel of awesomeness that we had not anticipated, should Molly learn to harness her new abilities. Add this all together and it seems like Extant is, slowly but surely, starting to scratch the surface of its potential as it keeps us guessing, introduces interesting detours and allows us to walk away from episodes with a sense that we learned something while also keeping us in the dark with regard to the larger picture. Extant airs on Wednesdays @10PM ET on CBS.
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  22. The past year, the copyright industry appears to have calmed down a bit, thinking it won the file-sharing wars. At the same time, people sharing culture and knowledge have done the same thing. This conflict is far from over. The two sides in the conflict over sharing culture and knowledge have rarely been further from each other in their view of the world. On one hand, you have the copyright industry, now content thinking it won the war against the net generation – or net generations by now (plural). File-sharing has stopped growing, the copyright industry observes, and controlled streaming is growing exponentially. New technology has produced a better offering that outcompeted the inferior pirate alternatives, and in the end, people wanted to do the legal thing, the copyright industry argues. But this is very far from the truth. The only true part of it is that the number of people sharing culture and knowledge is no longer growing exponentially, but that’s because the habit is saturated. One-third of young people in the US and Europe today share culture – in violation of the copyright monopoly – daily or almost-daily. A phenomenon can’t keep growing exponentially forever in a finite population: eventually, everybody’s doing it, and that’s the point we have arrived at now. Apart from that, it is true that the copyright industry has produced better offerings: Pandora, Netflix, and HBO streaming. But so have the people who manufacture their copies without a license. The Pirate Bay is ten years old; almost as old as Microsoft’s Windows XP, to put it in context. (Anybody remember Microsoft?) Yet, despite HBO’s successful and profitable subscription model, record numbers of us get our latest fix of Game of Thrones delivered automatically directly to our desktop the instant it is available, courtesy of RSS torrenting and EZTV, or your own favorite supplier. And if we don’t like torrenting, but actually like streaming? Turns out that the pirate equivalents of the commercial offerings far surpass the simplicity, accessibility, and ease of use of the copyright industry’s technology – and that’s not even going into selection and absence of laughingly stupid “not available in your country†messages. From Popcorn Time to Zona, the happy amateur sharers are miles and leagues ahead of the copyright industry. The technology that the copyright industry claims “already has won the war†for that obsolete industry? Well, it turns out that the net generation could use the same technology to build a lot better services still. Teens today make absolutely no distinction whether services are “legal†or not; they just grab stuff from where it’s easiest. In this environment, people on the other side – the people manufacturing unlicensed copies of knowledge and culture, and sharing those copies in turn – have also taken a victory for granted. We’re getting our Game of Thrones, we’re getting our movies and porn as we always have, what’s the big deal? The Pirate Bay team was sentenced in a mock trial five years ago to largely no effect whatsoever (except for those poor individuals), the site itself is still up, and new great services for manufacturing our own copies of knowledge and culture are appearing by the month. Why bother fighting? This is long over, right? Not so fast. SOPA and ACTA was just two years ago, in 2012. They were struck back, but their obfuscated spawn are already appearing. We’ve seen and heard the acronyms TPP, TTIP, CISP, CETA, and others. The copyright industry keeps working, it just does so out of the sunlight. In the end, this is about the power of narratives, the greatest power anybody has ever had. And the copyright industry isn’t giving it up without a fight. The file-sharing wars are far from over. There may be a bit of silence on the fronts at the moment. Enjoy it, and prepare for what’s coming. http://torrentfreak.com/the-file-sharing-wars-are-anything-but-over-140629/
  23. Why Are Porn Perfomers Scared to Talk About Internet Piracy? Most people affected by piracy are very happy to point the finger at sites like The Pirate Bay, but what if people were too scared to talk about the sites where their content is being made available illegally? What if, in some strange world, the sites hosting the pirated videos were the ones paying for the content in the first place? Internet porn is big – extremely big – and one of the reasons often cited for the rapid growth of the Internet. Every second there is an average of 28,258 Internet users watching porn online, together accounting for an estimated 35% of Internet downloads. Over the past few years, porn industry claims that its very existence has become threatened by piracy have only increased. In addition to the hundreds of torrent sites offering content for no charge, a new type of site has emerged offering a staggering and immediately accessible range of content, at an entry price of absolutely free. Due to their similarity with YouTube, these sites are known as ‘tube’ sites. They operate in much the same way as YouTube, with content being uploaded by their users for viewing by others. The space is dominated by giants including YouPorn and Pornhub, sites which have been heavily criticized due to the endless quantities of unauthorized content they host. But in the ever-evolving adult industry, things are not what they seem. Tube giant takeover ‘Mindgeek’ may not sound familiar to everyone, but this is the new name for one of the biggest companies in the adult industry. Formerly known as Manwin, Mindgeek is a huge company that has scooped up some of the biggest tube sites in the world including YouPorn, Pornhub, Tube8, XTube, RedTube, ExtremeTube and SpankWire to name a few. All in all, Mindgeek is reported to be one of the top three consumers of bandwidth in the world. While Mindgeek sites act within the law by operating an efficient DMCA process that removes user-uploaded content at the request of copyright holders, many adult producers and performers feel that the sites are hitting their bottom line. But while that might be true for some, for others a much more complex situation is emerging. A report this week from ABC showed the news outlet attempting to solicit comments from adult industry performers. However, when the topic turned to piracy on tube sites, suddenly they didn’t want to talk. “I can’t talk about THAT part,†said one actress walking away from the camera. “I really don’t want to say anything because I don’t want them to ban me.†“Them†in this context is Mindgeek, the operator of the tube sites offering unauthorized copies of porn movies uploaded by their users. So why are these actresses scared to talk about Mindgeek and what possible control could it have over them? Spending tube money After making huge quantities of cash via its tube sites, Manwin/Mindgeek bought up several top studios including Brazzers, Digital Playground, Mofos, MyDirtyHobby and Twistys. The company also sucked up the Reality Kings brand and became an online partner of Playboy. This means that some of the performers complaining about piracy on tube sites are actually being paid by the company running them. “Some people have asked me why i’m being a hypocrite and working for [Mindgeek companies],†one actress told ABC. “As a performer, boycotting these companies is not going to take any time, money or anything away from them because if I say no there are another hundred blondes who are willing to do it.†Providing yet another twist, the report also shows adult actress and outspoken piracy critic Tasha Reign arranging to have one of her illegally uploaded videos taken down from Mindgeek-owned PornHub. Reign then admits that she too works for Mindgeek. “It’s like we’re stuck between a rock and a hard place in a way, because if I want to shoot content then I kinda have to shoot for [Mindgeek] because that’s the company that books me because they own…almost…everything,†Reign says. In the meantime, it’s reported that a new porn video is made in the United States every 39 minutes. How many will be produced by Mindgeek companies or distributed via their tube sites remains to be seen, but in any event the company could be making money at one end, the other, or intriguingly – both ends at once. ABC US News | ABC Business News
  24. Hello Paters, We're absolutely proud to announce our 9th birthday! Starting in 2005, we are committed to deliver the finest Scene Audio Torrents and we’re still going strong. To celebrate our 9th year, we are also giving away 5gbs of uploaded credits to all users regardless of their user classes or account stats. Thank you all for your help to keep this site at it's best. We as the Proaudiotorrents Staff like to thank all the people who made this possible. Thanks to the staff , the donors and most off all the members who we work hard for. http://proaudiotorrents.org/login.php Kind regards, Ozziiee (on behalf of Pro Audio Torrents.org Staff)