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  1. A presumed pirate with an unusually large appetite for activating Windows 7 has incurred the wrath of Microsoft. In a lawsuit filed at a Washington court, the Seattle-based company said that it logged hundreds of suspicious product activations from a Verizon IP address and is now seeking damages. Due to the fact that one needs to be present on most computers in order for them to work at all, operating systems are among the most pirated types of software around. There can be little doubt that across its range in its 29 year history, Microsoft’s Windows operating systems have been pirated countless millions of times. It’s a practice that on some levels Microsoft has come to accept, with regular consumers largely avoiding the company’s aggression. However, as one or perhaps more pirates are about to find out, the same cannot be said of those pirating the company’s products on a commercial scale. In a lawsuit filed this week at a district court in Seattle, Microsoft targets individuals behind a single Verizon IP address – 74.111.202.30. Who he, she or they are is unknown at this point, but according to Microsoft they’re responsible for some serious Windows pirating. “As part of its cyberforensic methods, Microsoft analyzes product key activation data voluntarily provided by users when they activate Microsoft software, including the IP address from which a given product key is activated,†the lawsuit reads. Microsoft says that its forensic tools allow the company to analyze billions of activations of Microsoft software and identify patterns “that make it more likely than not†that an IP address associated with activations is one through which pirated software is being activated. “Microsoft’s cyberforensics have identified hundreds of product key activations originating from IP address 74.111.202.30…which is presently assigned to Verizon Online LLC. These activations have characteristics that on information and belief, establish that Defendants are using the IP address to activate pirated software.†Microsoft says that the defendant(s) have activated hundreds of copies of Windows 7 using product keys that have been “stolen†from the company’s supply chain or have never been issued with a valid license, or keys used more times than their license allows. In addition to immediate injunctive relief and the impounding of all infringing materials, the company demands profits attributable to the infringements, treble damages and attorney fees or, alternatively, statutory damages. This week’s lawsuit (pdf) follows similar action in December 2014 in which Microsoft targeted the user behind an AT&T account. https://torrentfreak.com/microsoft-logs-ip-addresses-to-catch-windows-7-pirates-150504/
  2. VPN users are facing a massive security flaw as websites can easily see their home IP-addresses through WebRTC. The vulnerability is limited to supporting browsers such as Firefox and Chrome, and appears to affect Windows users only. Luckily the security hole is relatively easy to fix. The Snowden revelations have made it clear that online privacy is certainly not a given. Just a few days ago we learned that the Canadian Government tracked visitors of dozens of popular file-sharing sites. As these stories make headlines around the world interest in anonymity services such as VPNs has increased, as even regular Internet users don’t like the idea of being spied on. Unfortunately, even the best VPN services can’t guarantee to be 100% secure. This week a very concerning security flaw revealed that it’s easy to see the real IP-addresses of many VPN users through a WebRTC feature. With a few lines of code websites can make requests to STUN servers and log users’ VPN IP-address and the “hidden†home IP-address, as well as local network addresses. The vulnerability affects WebRTC-supporting browsers including Firefox and Chrome and appears to be limited to Windows machines. A demo published on GitHub by developer Daniel Roesler allows people to check if they are affected by the security flaw. IP-address leak The demo claims that browser plugins can’t block the vulnerability, but luckily this isn’t entirely true. There are several easy fixes available to patch the security hole. Chrome users can install the WebRTC block extension or ScriptSafe, which both reportedly block the vulnerability. Firefox users should be able to block the request with the NoScript addon. Alternatively, they can type “about:config†in the address bar and set the “media.peerconnection.enabled†setting to false. TF asked various VPN providers to share their thoughts and tips on the vulnerability. Private Internet Access told us that the are currently investigating the issue to see what they can do on their end to address it. TorGuard informed us that they issued a warning in a blog post along with instructions on how to stop the browser leak. Ben Van Der Pelt, TorGuard’s CEO, further informed us that tunneling the VPN through a router is another fix. “Perhaps the best way to be protected from WebRTC and similar vulnerabilities is to run the VPN tunnel directly on the router. This allows the user to be connected to a VPN directly via Wi-Fi, leaving no possibility of a rogue script bypassing a software VPN tunnel and finding one’s real IP,†Van der Pelt says. “During our testing Windows users who were connected by way of a VPN router were not vulnerable to WebRTC IP leaks even without any browser fixes,†he adds. While the fixes above are all reported to work, the leak is a reminder that anonymity should never be taken for granted. As is often the case with these type of vulnerabilities, VPN and proxy users should regularly check if their connection is secure. This also includes testing against DNS leaks and proxy vulnerabilities. http://torrentfreak.com/huge-security-flaw-leaks-vpn-users-real-ip-addresses-150130/
  3. The newly launched torrent search engine BTindex crawls BitTorrent's DHT network for new files. It's a handy service, but one that comes with a controversial twist. In addition to listing hundreds of thousands of magnet links, it also exposes the IP-addresses of BitTorrent users to the rest of the world. Unless BitTorrent users are taking steps to hide their identities through the use of a VPN, proxy, or seedbox, their downloading habits are available for almost anyone to snoop on. By design the BitTorrent protocol shares the location of any user in the swarm. After all, without knowing where to send the data nothing can be shared to begin with. Despite this fairly common knowledge, even some experienced BitTorrent users can be shocked to learn that someone has been monitoring their activities, let alone that their sharing activity is being made public for the rest of the world to see. Like it or not, this is exactly what the newly launched torrent search engine BTindex is doing. Unlike most popular torrent sites BTindex adds new content by crawling BitTorrent’s DHT network. This is already quite unique as most other sites get their content from user uploads or other sites. However, the most controversial part without doubt is that the IP-addresses of BitTorrent users are being shared as well. People who download a file from The Pirate Bay or any other torrent site expose their IP-addresses via the DHT network. BTindex records this information alongside the torrent metadata. The number of peers are displayed in the search results and for each file a selection of IP-addresses is made available to the public. http://torrentfreak.com/btindex-expo...-users-140807/