TRACKERFANCLUB

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TRACKERFANCLUB last won the day on September 6

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  1. Tracker Name: seedfile.ro Genre: General Sign-up Link: http://seedfile.ro/register Closing Date: N/A Additional Information: N/A
  2. Tracker Name: AOX (4.0) Genre: Movies Sign-up Link: https://aox.to/index.php?page=signup Closing Date: Open for a few days more Additional Information: AOX is a Private Torrent Tracker for Asian Movies / TV Releases.
  3. A notorious hacker group broke into the servers of music-streaming service Vevo, releasing more than 3 terabytes of internal documents and video content online — before removing them later Friday morning at Vevo’s request. The purloined cache, posted by hacking and security collective OurMine, included videos, a batch of documents labeled “premieres,” as well as marketing info, international social-media documents, and other internal files, as first reported by tech site Gizmodo. Vevo confirmed the hack, which it said was the result of a phishing scam via LinkedIn. “We have addressed the issue and are investigating the extent of exposure,” Vevo said in a statement. The 3.12-terabyte trove of stolen documents included Vevo’s internal dossiers on about 9o artists, including Ariana Grande, Britney Spears, Calvin Harris, Florida Georgia Line, Jennifer Lopez, Justin Bieber, Katy Perry, Madonna, One Direction, Sia, Taylor Swift, The Weeknd, and U2. OurMine, in a post on its site, claimed it leaked the Vevo files late Thursday after an exchange with a Vevo employee who — upon being informed of the hack — allegedly told the hackers, “F— off, you don’t have anything.” In an update Friday morning, OurMine said that “We deleted the files because of a request from VEVO.” OurMine over the past few years has targeted numerous companies and high-profile individuals, ostensibly as a guerrilla-style marketing effort for its security services. Last month, OurMine hijacked the social-media accounts of HBO, which separately this summer was threatened with extortion demands from a hacker that stole 1.5 TB of the programmer’s files. Other victims have included Netflix, Marvel, Google, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Twitter chief Jack Dorsey. New York-based Vevo is jointly owned by Universal Music Group, Sony Music Entertainment, Warner Music Group, Abu Dhabi Media, and Alphabet (Google’s parent).
  4. Tracker Name: CGPeers Genre: Other Sign-up Link: https://www.cgpeers.com/register.php Closing Date: Open for 1 day Additional Information: CGPeers is a tracker for 3D/Visual Effects/Computer Graphics/Design/Computer Assisted Art material.
  5. Global Freeleech Mode Activated! + Global Double Upload Activated! 2day(s)10hour(s)50minute(s)9second(s) Search System 2.0 is live! Now a faceted search system. All search request perform with ajax so there is no redirecting or refreshing the page, it return the result very quickly. Search by name,imdb number, tvdb number or tmdb number. Further more can filter your search to a specific type, category, discount or special. EVEN FURTHER MORE you can then sort your results by Upload Date, Alphabetical, Seeders, Leechers, Times Completed and Size. Couple with ascending or descending direction and how many results you want displayed per pagination! Hope you enjoy this new search system!
  6. SceneAccess has thrown in the towel. Its admins pulled the plug on the private tracker after operating for more than a decade. According to a public notice, the decision was the result of dwindling donations, which made it hard to pay the bills. SceneAccess (ScT) has been a respected and well-connected private BitTorrent tracker for more than a decade, but a few hours ago it closed its doors. The operators of the tracker, which recently stopped enforcing a mandatory share ratio, had been complaining about a lack of financial support for a while. “As we stand now, we have NO money left to pay our bills and the lights WILL go out,” one of the staffers wrote earlier this year, urging the site’s members to chip in to help the site stay online. Apparently, these frequent donation reminders were unsuccessful. Today, members of the tracker, some of which have been with the site for more than tens years, are greeted by a farewell notice. “After putting a decade of blood, sweat and tears – it is time to throw in the towel. It is time for us to close this chapter…” it reads, thanking all donors who helped the site over the years. “As times change, so do peoples priorities and without continued economical support from the community, it is impossible to run a site of this size. It’s been a pleasure for all of us to serve you with pride and honor.” SceneAccess shuts down SceneAccess has seen its fair share of trouble over the years. The site was raided in its early days, forced by anti-piracy group BREIN to switch hosts, DDoSed on several occasions, and suffered a leak of user data, among other things. While it recovered from all these events, a lack of financial support now means that the end has finally come. The tracker is not the only site to run low on donations. Many trackers, including several of the big players, have complained about the same issue in recent years. While there may always be additional factors in play when a site shuts down, it is clear that SceneAccess is not coming back, unless there is some magical turnaround. This means that its users have to find a new home, wherever that may be. “Thank you for 11 amazing years. We wish you all the best in your future endeavors,” SCC concludes. Another one bites the dust… https://torrentfreak.com/private-torrent-tracker-sceneaccess-shuts-down-170912/
  7. Shutdown confirmed From a staff member: The Web page has been shut down since the webmaster could not take care of it or anyone else in the team (including me) just to thank you all that you have contributed to the site. Greetings to all.
  8. Tracker Name: Synthesiz3r (ST3) Genre: Music Sign-up Link: https://synthesiz3r.com/register.php Closing Date: N/A Additional Information: Synthesiz3r (ST3) is a Private Torrent Tracker for ELECTRONIC MUSIC.
  9. Open Signups! 16 hours, 26 mins ago For the next two days our doors are open for new members(without invite). Please let your friends know
  10. The Kodi team, operating under the XBMC Foundation, is taking a stand against 'trademark trolls' who abuse the Kodi name for personal profit. They accuse the Canadian trademark owner of actively blackmailing hardware vendors and removing content from Amazon. If needed, the foundation says that it may have to take legal action to keep its software freely accessible. More and more people are starting to use Kodi-powered set-top boxes to stream video content to their TVs. While Kodi itself is a neutral platform, unauthorized add-ons give it a bad name. This is one of the reasons why the Kodi team is actively going after vendors who sell “fully loaded” pirate boxes and YouTubers who misuse their name to promote copyright infringement. However, these “pirates” are not the only intellectual property problem the team is facing; trademark trolls are a serious threat as well. When XBMC changed its name to Kodi, they noticed that several parties swiftly registered the Kodi trademark around the world, presumably to make money off it. This came as a total surprise to the foundation, which never faced any trademark issues before, and it continues to cause problems today. The Kodi team has since convinced some of these “trolls” to hand over the trademarks, but not all are willing to give in. This is causing problems, particularly in Canada, where the local trademark owner is actively blackmailing hardware vendors and removing content from Amazon, the Kodi team says. The Canadian trademark is owned by Geoff Gavora, who is no stranger to the XBMC Foundation. Before the trouble started, Gavora had already sent several emails to the Kodi team, expressing how important the software was to his sales. After the trademark registration, however, the friendly tone changed. “We had hoped, given the positive nature of his past emails, that perhaps he was doing this for the benefit of the Foundation. We learned, unfortunately, that this was not the case,” XBMC Foundation President Nathan Betzen notes. “Instead, companies like Mygica and our sponsor Minix have been delisted by Gavora on Amazon, so that only Gavora’s hardware can be sold, unless those companies pay him a fee to stay on the store,” he adds. Gavora is actively using his trademark to stop the sales of other Kodi based devices in Canada, the XBMC Foundation warns. This means that people who buy a Kodi product in the local Amazon store may end up filling the pocket of the local trademark owner. “Now, if you do a search for Kodi on Amazon.ca, there’s a very real chance that every box you see is giving Gavora money to advertise that they can run what should be the entirely free and open Kodi. Gavora and his company are behaving in true trademark troll fashion,” Betzen writes. There are several reasons why the Kodi team is making this problem public now. For one, they want the public to be aware of the situation. At some point, trademark trolls may even try to stop Kodi from distributing the software through their own site, they warn. However, the foundation is not going to let this happen without a fight. They are ready to deal with the problem head on. Trademark trolls should not be allowed to exploit the Kodi name for financial profit. “We want to let the trolls know that we have caught on to this game and will not accept it. We are actively taking the necessary steps to ensure that the Kodi trademark trolls are dealt with appropriately. There is no value proposition in trolling the Kodi name,’ Betzen writes. If this means that the foundation has to go to court, they are prepared to do so, hoping that the community will have their back. “While our goal has always been to avoid going to the court to ensure Kodi remains free in countries where trolls are attempting to get rich off of the Kodi name, we will not back down from protecting the free, open source nature of our software. “If that time comes for legal action, we hope to have the community’s support,” Betzen concludes. https://torrentfreak.com/kodi-declares-war-on-trademark-trolls-170908/
  11. While millions of people were sending in comments urging the FCC to stop a looming repeal of current net neutrality rules, the MPAA focused on something else. In a recently submitted letter, the Hollywood group doesn't argue for or against the proposals. It merely wants to ensure that future net neutrality regulation doesn't hinder anti-piracy efforts. This summer, millions of people protested the FCC’s plan to repeal the net neutrality rules that were put in place by the former Obama administration. Well over 22 million comments are listed on the FCC site already and among those we spotted a response from the main movie industry lobby group, the MPAA. Acting on behalf of six major Hollywood studios, the MPAA is not getting involved in the repeal debate. It instead highlights that, if the FCC maintains any type of network neutrality rules, these shouldn’t get in the way of its anti-piracy efforts. The Hollywood group stresses that despite an increase in legal services, online piracy remains a problem. Through various anti-piracy measures, rightsholders are working hard to combat this threat, which is their right by law. “Copyright owners and content providers have a right under the Copyright and Communications acts to combat theft of their content, and the law encourages internet intermediaries to collaborate with content creators to do so,” the MPAA writes. Now that the net neutrality rules are facing a possible revision or repeal, the MPAA wants to make it very clear that any future regulation should not get in the way of these anti-piracy efforts. “The MPAA therefore asks that any network neutrality rules the FCC maintains or adopts make explicit that such rules do not limit the ability of copyright owners and their licensees to combat copyright infringement,” the group writes to the FCC. This means that measures such as website blocking, which could be considered to violate net neutrality as it discriminates against specific traffic, should be allowed. The same is true for other filtering and blocking efforts. The MPAA’s position doesn’t come as a surprise and given the FCC’s actions in the past, Hollywood has little to worry about. The current net neutrality rules, which were put in place by the Obama administration, specifically exclude pirate traffic. “Nothing in this part prohibits reasonable efforts by a provider of broadband Internet access service to address copyright infringement or other unlawful activity,” the current net neutrality order reads. “We reiterate that our rules do not alter the copyright laws and are not intended to prohibit or discourage voluntary practices undertaken to address or mitigate the occurrence of copyright infringement,” the FCC previously clarified. Still, the MPAA is better safe than sorry. This is not the first time that the MPAA has got involved in net neutrality debates. Behind the scenes the group has been lobbying US lawmakers on this issue for several years, previously arguing for similar net neutrality exceptions in Brazil and India. — The MPAA’s full comments can be found here (pdf). https://torrentfreak.com/mpaa-net-neutrality-rules-should-not-hinder-anti-piracy-efforts-170907/
  12. Amid government attempts to regulate the internet more closely, privacy campaigners yesterday debated how to balance privacy and data protection with regulation. Legislation like the Digital Economy Act and the Investigatory Powers Act show the government's actions to monitor people's web activity more closely. Many civil organisations, such as Liberty and the Open Rights Group, have fought against these new laws, which they believe restrict citizens' digital freedoms. In the debate, three individuals from different organisations gave their opinion on internet regulation in general. Clive Stafford Smith, a lawyer at human rights organisation Reprieve, told attendees of Lush's Creative Showcase that he does not believe in regulation at all. He disagreed with the government's stance on backdoors to encryption after prime minister Theresa May and home secretary Amber Rudd repeatedly attacked messaging encryption. Previous versions of the Investigatory Powers Act had proposed backdoors to encryption, but this was eventually dropped from the bill that passed Parliament in late 2016. Stafford Smith said:"[It's] monumentally stupid to agree with Amber Rudd and Theresa May that 'you have nothing to hide so why should you care?'" Stafford Smith stressed that the UK should protect people against the abuse of their personal information. Renate Samson, from privacy campaign group Big Brother Watch, said there needs to be some form of regulation as the internet "is a parallel, a mirror of our lives", but argued that the government has overstepped its authority with the Digital Economy Act, which will change how our data is shared with government departments to allow ministers to share citizens' personal information without permission. Samson said citizens don't have the same protections online as they do in the physical world, and said: "Now we need to start having those protections." Nikki Maksimovic, who works at search engine Ecosia, said that internet regulation exceeds all geographic borders, but differs greatly from country to country. "China is doing one thing, Russia is doing another thing" she pointed out. "How do you start to come to an agreement?" Samson claimed that the UK's Government Digital Service (GDS) had engaged with the Estonia model for a really long time "and yet they didn't appear brave enough to adopt it". She underlined that there was a risk, since you need an identity number, but the reason why it wasn't adopted was because the government "are required to inform you of every time they access your data, and why. And our government aren't brave enough to do that".
  13. Tracker Name: SceneXpress Genre: Movies Sign-up Link: http://www.scenexpress.eu Closing Date: N/A Additional information: Tracker Name: SceneXpress Tracker Genre: Movies/General Tracker Type: Ratio Based Bonus System: Yes Tracker Birthday: n/a Free torrents: Yes Maintaining Ratio: Easy Tracker Singup: Open Tracker URL: http://www.scenexpress.eu Banned Countries: n/a Tracker IRC: n/a RSS: Yes Tracker's Twitter Account: n/a Tracker's FaceBook Account: n/a Members: n/a Torrents: n/a
  14. Last week the documentary "Kim Dotcom: Caught in the Web" was released to the public. While sales are going well, it was inevitable that the film would be widely shared among pirates too. Today we catch up with director Annie Goldson to hear her thoughts on piracy and how the movie industry should respond. When you make a documentary about Kim Dotcom, someone who’s caught up in one of the largest criminal copyright infringement cases in history, the piracy issue is unavoidable. And indeed, the topic is discussed in depth in “Kim Dotcom: Caught in the Web,” which enjoyed its digital release early last week. As happens with most digital releases, a pirated copy soon followed. While no filmmaker would actively encourage people not to pay for their work, director Annie Goldson wasn’t surprised at all when she saw the first unauthorized copies appear online. The documentary highlights that piracy is in part triggered by lacking availability, so it was a little ironic that the film itself wasn’t released worldwide on all services. However, Goldson had no direct influence on the distribution process. “It was inevitable really. We have tried to adopt a distribution model that we hope will encourage viewers to buy legal copies making it available as widely as possible,” Goldson informs TorrentFreak. “We had sold the rights, so didn’t have complete control over reach or pricing which I think are two critical variables that do impact on the degree of piracy. Although I think our sales agent did make good strides towards a worldwide release.” Now that millions of pirates have access to her work for free, it will be interesting to see how this impacts sales. For now, however, there’s still plenty of legitimate interest, with the film now appearing in the iTunes top ten of independent films. In any case, Goldson doesn’t subscribe to the ‘one instance of piracy is a lost sale’ theory and notes that views about piracy are sharply polarized. “Some claim financial devastation while others argue that infringement leads to ‘buzz,’ that this can generate further sales – so we shall see. At one level, watching this unfold is quite an interesting research exercise into distribution, which ironically is one of the big themes of the film of course,” Goldson notes. Piracy overall doesn’t help the industry forward though, she says, as it hurts the development of better distribution models. “I’m opposed to copyright infringement and piracy as it muddies the waters when it comes to devising a better model for distribution, one that would nurture and support artists and creatives, those that do the hard yards.” Kim Dotcom: Caught in the Web trailer The director has no issues with copyright enforcement either. Not just to safeguard financial incentives, but also because the author does have moral and ethical rights about how their works are distributed. That said, instead of pouring money into enforcement, it might be better spent on finding a better business model. “I’m with Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales who says [in the documentary] that the problem is primarily with the existing business model. If you make films genuinely available at prices people can afford, at the same time throughout the world, piracy would drop to low levels. “I think most people would prefer to access their choice of entertainment legally rather than delving into dark corners of the Internet. I might be wrong of course,” Goldson adds. In any case, ‘simply’ enforcing piracy into oblivion seems to be an unworkable prospect – not without massive censorship, or the shutdown of the entire Internet. “I feel the risk is that anti-piracy efforts will step up and erode important freedoms. Or we have to close down the Internet altogether. After all, the unwieldy beast is a giant copying machine – making copies is what it does well,” Goldson says. The problems is that the industry is keeping piracy intact through its own business model. When people can’t get what they want, when, and where they want it, they often turn to pirate sites. “One problem is that the industry has been slow to change and hence we now have generations of viewers who have had to regularly infringe to be part of a global conversation. “I do feel if the industry is promoting and advertising works internationally, using globalized communication and social media, then denying viewers from easily accessing works, either through geo-blocking or price points, obviously, digitally-savvy viewers will find them regardless,” Goldson adds. And yes, this ironically also applies to her own documentary. The solution is to continue to improve the legal options. This is easier said than done, as Goldson and her team tried hard, so it won’t happen overnight. However, universal access for a decent price would seem to be the future. Unless the movie industry prefers to shut down the Internet entirely, of course. — For those who haven’t seen “Kim Dotcom: Caught in the Web yet,” the film is available globally on Vimeo OnDemand, and in a lot of territories on iTunes, the PlayStation Store, Amazon, Google Play, and the Microsoft/Xbox Store. In the US there is also Vudu, Fandango Now & Verizon. If that doesn’t work, then… https://torrentfreak.com/director-of-kim-dotcom-documentary-speaks-out-on-piracy-170902/