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  2. qBittorrent 4.0.3 is scheduled to include source field editing to new torrents, which will allow users of private trackers to make their torrents unique without having to change the piece size (which PTP, etc does by default). https://github.com/qbittorrent/qBittorrent/pull/7985
  3. Today
  4. A series of documents released by the US Department of State have revealed how Sweden was pressed to take action against The Pirate Bay. According to US officials, this directly led to law enforcement's decision to shut down the torrent site more than ten years ago. Sweden, meanwhile, avoided a spot on the feared US Trade Representative's 301 Watch List. It’s well known that the US Government is actively involved in copyright enforcement efforts around the globe. In some countries they’ve actively helped write copyright law. Elsewhere, U.S. authorities provide concrete suggestions for improvement, including in Sweden. After The Pirate Bay was raided for the first time, more than ten years ago, the media highlighted that the U.S. Government and Hollywood pulled strings behind the scenes. However, little was known about what this actually entailed. Today we can provide more context, thanks to a Freedom of Information request that was sent to the U.S. Department of State. While the events happened a decade ago, they show how action against The Pirate Bay was discussed at the highest political level. The trail starts with a cable sent from the US Embassy in Sweden to Washington in November 2005. This is roughly six months before the Pirate Bay raid, which eventually resulted in criminal convictions for four men connected to the site. The Embassy writes that Hollywood’s MPAA and the local Anti-Piracy Bureau (APB) met with US Ambassador Bivins and, separately, with Swedish State Secretary of Justice at the time, Dan Eliasson. The Pirate Bay issue was at the top of the agenda during these meetings. “The MPA is particularly concerned about PirateBay, the world‘s largest Torrent file-sharing tracker. According to the MPA and based on Embassy’s follow-up discussions, the Justice Ministry is very interested in a constructive dialogue with the US. on these concerns,” the cable reads. “Embassy understands that State and Commerce officials have also met with Swedish officials in Washington on the same concern,” it adds, with the Embassy requesting further “guidance” from Washington. The document adds that there has been some movement on the piracy enforcement front in Sweden, with two legal cases pending. However, those were not the targets Hollywood was looking for. “We have yet to see a ‘big fish’ tried – something the MPA badly wants to see, particularly in light of the fact that Sweden hosts the largest Bit Torrent file-sharing tracker in the world, ‘Pirate-Bay’, which openly flaunts IPR,” the cable writer comments. Interestingly, Hollywood and the authorities were aware of the fact that a case against The Pirate Bay wouldn’t be an easy one. The site never stored any infringing material directly and had proper legal backing, the cable points out. “However, it is not clear to us what constraints Sweden and even U.S. authorities would be under in pursuing a case like this when the site is legally well advised and studiously avoids storing any copyrighted material.” At the time there were some rumors that Sweden would be placed on the US Trade Representative’s 301 Watch List. This could possibly result in negative trade implications. However, in a cable written April 2006, the US Embassy in Sweden was informed that, while there were concerns, it would not be listed. Not yet at least. “We understand that a specialized organization for enforcement against Internet piracy currently is under consideration,” the cable reads, while mentioning The Pirate Bay once again. “We are encouraged by reports of ongoing efforts related to Internet piracy in Sweden; however, the increase in Pirate Bay peers, up 74 percent in just the last 7 months, demonstrates the urgent need to step up current efforts dramatically to address this issue in the near term.” Then the ‘inevitable’ happened. On May 31, 2006, The Pirate Bay was raided by 65 Swedish police officers. They entered a datacenter in Stockholm with instructions to shut down the Pirate Bay’s servers and collect vital evidence. A few weeks after the raid, the Embassy sent another cable to Washington informing the homefront on the apparent success of their efforts. “Starting with the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) visit to post last fall, Embassy Stockholm has engaged intensely with our Swedish interlocutors in efforts to improve IPR enforcement, in particular with regard to Internet piracy. The actions on May 31 thus mark a significant victory for our IPR efforts.” The US clearly saw a link between their diplomatic maneuvering and the Pirate Bay raid. This link was also brought up in the media at the time, with news reports citing sources claiming that Justice Minister Bodström and his State Secretary Dan Eliasson ordered the police raid under US pressure. Interestingly, both Bodström and Eliasson denied any direct involvement of the Justice Ministry with the work of the police and prosecutors in the Pirate Bay case. While the cables make it very clear that the US wanted The Pirate Bay gone, the Embassy said that the raid went beyond their expectations, suggesting they were not directly involved. The pressure was clearly there though. In future cables, the Pirate Bay case was often mentioned, with regular updates on the media backlash and progress in the criminal investigation. According to the US Embassy in Sweden, shutting down The Pirate Bay “should not be underestimated as a sign of [Sweden’s] willingness to take action and their position against illegal piracy.” The cables also make clear that in Washington, the Pirate Bay raid was celebrated as a victory that was directly triggered by US diplomacy. In a cable sent in April 2007, the Embassy nominated one of its employees, whose name is redacted, for the State Department’s Foreign Service National (FSN) of the year award. Again, The Pirate Bay case was brought up. “REDACTED has spearheaded-work on Internet piracy enforcement in Sweden. The issue is particularly acute here as Sweden was home to the largest Internet piracy site (Pirate Bay) in the world. The work has involved extensive contacts with the Ministry of Justice, the Motion Picture Agency, as well as the Anti-Piracy Bureau.” The employee is praised for her diplomatic efforts behind the scenes which directly led to the decision to raid The Pirate Bay, the Embassy writes. “REDACTED skillful outreach directly led to a bold decision by Swedish law enforcement authorities to raid Pirate Bay and shut it down. This was recognized as a major achievement in Washington in furthering U.S. efforts to combat Internet piracy worldwide.” Despite US officials taking credit for the Pirate Bay raid, it didn’t turn out to be the success they had hoped for. The notorious torrent site was back online after three days, “flaunting IPR” bolder and braver than ever before. The press coverage was largely unfavorable towards the US Government and Hollywood, while the people behind the site were seen as heroes by many. The US Embassy in Sweden was well aware of the delicate situation but kept pushing for stronger copyright measures behind the scenes. This time even further in the background than before. “The Pirate Bay raid was portrayed as caving to USG pressure. The delicate situation made it difficult, if not counter-productive, for the Embassy to play a public role on IPR issues. Behind the scenes, the Embassy has worked well with all stakeholders,” Washington was informed February 2008. At the time, Sweden was being considered for the 301 Watch List once again. The Embassy pointed out that, given the public suspicion, this could backfire. The other option was to keep a potential watch list entry as a “looming threat” while Sweden implements the changes they’re looking for. “The USG [US Govt] has to carefully determine which course of action will be the most productive; (1) a Watch-Listing with potentially negative repercussions in future GOS [Swedish Govt.] cooperation and in the public eye; or (2) continuing to exercise influence behind the scenes, with a potential Watch-Listing looming in the background as a continued threat.” As our earlier coverage has shown, Sweden then went on to implement a list of copyright changes which also happened to be proposed by US copyright holders. Needless to say, Sweden was never placed on the US Trade Representative’s 301 Watch List. TorrentFreak spoke with Peter Sunde, one of the Pirate Bay co-founders who was indicted after the raid, and who has since served a jail sentence for his involvement with the site. He is happy to see the new information being released. This is yet more confirmation of what he and many others have known for quite some time. While former Swedish State Secretary of Justice Dan Eliasson, who now happens to be the national police commissioner, denied any direct orders from the Justice Ministry, it’s clear that US pressure made an impact. “It’s been an open secret that the USG was behind the unlawful raid against The Pirate Bay, and exerting their power with threats against Sweden like this. It’s nice to see these documents coming up, interestingly enough from the most secretive of governments,” he says. There is still a lot of information missing though. The documents mention a fifth person that was supposed to be indicted, for example, which is completely new information. Sunde hopes that Sweden will open up its secret archives as well. “I’m hoping that Sweden will not follow up and release the 747 documents they’ve classified as secret regarding this affair. The Minister of Justice at the time, Thomas Bodström, said that he would put all the cards on the table so the public would now what happened, but then classified these 747 documents as secret. “Sweden has a proud history of transparency, celebrating 250 years of freedom of the press this year, and it’s an open sore that these documents are being held as classified,” Sunde adds. — The relevant responses to the Freedom of Information request, which was submitted by Rachael Tackett and shared with TorrentFreak, areavailable here. https://torrentfreak.com/how-the-us-pushed-sweden-to-take-down-the-pirate-bay-171212/
  5. Trump FCC Chairman Ajit Pai -- a former Verizon exec -- says that we can count on ISPs to voluntarily refrain from abusing their natural monopolies to degrade service to their customers in order to maximize their profits. But Pai's FCC also wants to be sure that companies like Verizon face no competition when they provide internet access, banning cities from creating municipal networks, even in places where no ISP is willing to provide internet access. In this regard, Pai's FCC is carrying on the work of the GW Bush years, which killed the pro-competitive practice of requiring incumbent phone companies to lease their equipment to new entrants to the market, who could discipline these old companies by offering competition. The result of years of Republican opposition of telcoms competition means that most Americans only have one or two options for broadband. What's more, lax anti-competition enforcement opened the door to those ISPs merging and abusing their power, repeatedly breaching net neutrality rules and degrading their customers' connections to the internet in order to solicit bribes from internet companies to be "protected" from this discriminatory treatment. A new report from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance reveals the full scale of the problem: of the 129,000,000 Americans served by a single ISP, 50,000,000 have to rely on monopolist providers that have been convicted of breaching Net Neutrality. Another 50,000,000 Americans are served by only two ISPs, and all of those duopolists have also been convicted of breaching net neutrality. For our analysis, we focused on the two biggest cable and telephone monopolies: AT&T, Verizon, Charter, and Comcast. These firms have multiple violations of both the letter and spirit of the rules around network neutrality and have spent millions to prevent the FCC from enforcing the rules. Free Press compiled a list of violations and here is some additional evidence: AT&T exempted DirecTV from its data caps; AT&T and Verizon on data cap exemptions; Verizon throttling Netflix; Verizon Lawyer tells federal court it wants paid prioritization; Comcast removes pledge against paid prioritization; Charter messes with inter-connection points to create fast lanes. There is more - such as Comcast's throttling BitTorrent while lying to subscribers about it Repealing Net Neutrality Puts 177 Million Americans at Risk [Institute for Local Self-Reliance] More than 100 Million Americans Can Only Get Internet Service from Companies That Have Violated Net Neutrality [Kaleigh Rogers/Motherboard]
  6. Nine years ago, the federal government painfully pushed the public into the arms of digital TV. Soon enough, we could be making that upgrade all over again. With all the recent chatter about Ajit Pai’s aggressive attempt to roll back net neutrality standards, it’s easy for other parts of the Federal Communications Commission’s winding docket to get lost. But there are things that the FCC is doing beyond ruining your internet that are worth discussing. One of those things is the recent passage of a measure to allow the voluntary rollout of ATSC 3.0, a television transmission standard that could bring both higher-resolution broadcasts and more interactivity to the boob tube. The vote to allow the standard to move forward on a voluntary basis, which passed last month on a 3-2 vote, was nearly as controversial as the net neutrality rollback. Broadcast groups like the National Association of Broadcasters cheered it on; competing groups like the American Cable Association strongly criticized it. No matter the case, it highlights the strongly partisan split facing telecom issues these days. The measure got a fairly muted response outside the realm of the telecom sphere, however. People aren't discussing it in quite the same way as net neutrality. But should we? Let’s talk about it, and put it in context with the last time the federal government pushed us to upgrade our TVs. It might just be the future of TV broadcasting. Why we’re seeing a push for a new broadcasting standard now In the last piece I wrote about digital television, I noted that there were pockets of people who felt that the replacement ultimately wasn’t as good an option as the system that we lost—i.e., the staticky one that worked well with nearly every television set produced over a 60-year period. Of course, those cries of disappointment were in vain. By that point, the broadcast industry and the US government (along with their international counterparts) had put so much time, money, and energy into creating a more modern iteration of over-the-air television that there was no turning back even if they wanted to. In 2009, the broadcast industry had invested nearly two decades of work into that standard, with the Advanced Television Systems Committee, or ATSC, which was formed in 1983, taking the lead on creating the standard the US and a number of other countries ultimately used. (Standards are important for television; the FCC created the National Television System Committee, or NTSC, in 1941 to nail down the broadcast standard used during the latter half of the 20th century. In 1950, a second iteration of NTSC made color TV possible and standards-friendly.) At this point, ATSC 3.0 isn’t nearly at the no-turning-back point. But it is knee-deep in its experimental stages, something that the committee has been working on since at least 2011, with a clear desire to build with an eye toward the next generation of televisions. ATSC 1.0, or HDTV, was built a quarter-century ago; they’re future-proofing for the next quarter-century, which is why they appear to have blown past ATSC 2.0. As a result, compared to the prior standard, ATSC 3.0 is way more detailed and complex. Internally, the committee describes the initiative as “a suite of voluntary technical standards and recommended practices,” one that represents far more sophistication than previous television standards. Or another way to put it: If done right, it’ll make you never miss your crummy CRT ever again. Five of the many features of the ATSC 3.0 standard Super-duper high resolution. Current ATSC standards, which support 1080i resolutions of 1920 by 1080 pixels, haven’t kept up with the resolutions of current TV sets, which now support 4k resolution, also called ultra-high-definition television (UHDTV). “Note that it is the intention for the ATSC 3.0 system to support delivery to fixed devices of content with video resolutions up to Ultra High Definition 3840 by 2160 at 60fps, or such higher frame rates and/or resolutions as may be determined to be desirable and practical,” the organization explains in its overview of the standard. The standard will also include greatly improved audio and will support high-end video and audio codecs that make the most of the over-the-air bandwidth. Mobile television capabilities. One of the weak points of the current digital television standards used in most parts of the world is that they’re not designed to be used in mobile contexts—which makes sense, as the standards were largely built before mobile phones had taken over the world. ATSC 3.0 attempts to fill this gap, however, by allowing mobile playback on phones at 1080i resolutions. Built-in channel guides. Like the annoying cable boxes of the present, the ATSC system includes a standard for service messaging which is intended to make it easier for people to find something to watch or even load up video on demand functionality. Hopefully this means you need a little less hardware in the long run. Watermarking. The system will also be a boon for copyright-holders, as it will include built-in standards for audio and video watermarking, which could help with the pesky piracy problems common with television shows. “Service usage reporting,” AKA tracking. Famously, Nielsen has always had a hard time trying to figure out who’s watching what, leading to issues where shows that were widely appreciated by audiences got low ratings because Nielsen’s samples were off. ATSC 3.0 includes tracking capabilities built right in, which advertisers are going to love, but also has benefits for consumers—if the system knows you live in a certain area during a time of emergency, it might be able to potentially warn you. Of course, this cuts both ways, because people already hate being tracked on the Internet. The killer feature of ATSC 3.0 could change the way we use the internet These features are all well and good, but they pale in comparison to the most dramatic feature that the standard could enable: The ability for the internet and broadcast television to work together. Fred Baumgartner, the man who is currently heading up the transition efforts for the local-TV conglomerate Sinclair Broadcasting, wrote a detailed piece for TV Technology last year (while he was working for a different company, Nautel) that explains the key issue the platform is trying to solve: The internet protocol, or IP, distribution capabilities used by over-the-top (OTT) services like Netflix or Hulu take up a lot of the internet’s bandwidth, which isn’t optimized for broadcasting video quite like your antenna is. In other words, ATSC 3.0 could potentially take some the pressure off of the internet in distributing interactive content by using broadcast protocols. From his piece: "While the bulk of all Internet traffic is video by a wide margin, it is still a very small amount of the total video consumed. Video-on-demand from OTT sources like Netflix, Youtube and Hulu, as well as the broadcast networks, is being consumed on devices that can be used nearly anywhere—including a lot of places [over-the-air] TV doesn’t reach. Internet access and capacity is growing, consuming more RF “wireless” spectrum and reaching farther into the corners of the world. This is the gap ATSC 3.0 fills." "Only a sliver of TV viewing is delivered via IP, and the IP networks are a long way from having the capacity to deliver all of the TV consumers watch with the quality they expect. Right now, IPTV is a bit of a miracle; it’s a bundle of buffers, sparingly supported multicast protocols, switches, edge servers, and best effort adaptive streaming techniques. It is well understood that watching an Internet video may or may not be a good experience. Reflect on how the far rarer “rain fades” on direct-to-home satellite are considered by many viewers as an “insufferable” impairment." This combining of broadband internet protocol with the broadcast airwaves, would taking advantage of the advantages of each communications channel. Could this turn buffering into a thing of the past for streaming video? That’s the idea, to put it simply. So what will ATSC 3.0 mean for your television experience? Well, at the moment, not much. It’s voluntary for now—you’re not going to be required to do anything to upgrade your TV to view broadcast signals, like you did in 2009. (Your phone might need an upgrade someday, though it might be tough with the lack of ATSC support on smartphones at the moment.) If you want 4K signals over broadcast, this is your path, but ultimately not a lot of people are clamoring for that right this second. For now, you’re not going to find many options on the market that support the new technology, let alone stations that can make the technology work. (Head to South Korea if you don’t want to wait.) However, it could become a much bigger deal down the road, for one reason: ATSC 3.0 is not backwards compatible with your current digital television. The hardest part of the 2009 digital television switchover for consumers, if you’ll remember, was the purchase of upgrade equipment that was cheaply made and pushed along by vouchers handed out by the federal government—something mandated by a 2005 law. Notably, the current FCC rulemaking makes no attempt to make allocations for such upgrade equipment, as it’s not considered necessary for now. Of course, all of this has the potential to leave out a whole lot of have-nots if it’s not eventually remedied. FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel, who has emerged as the highest-profile critic of Ajit Pai, suggested in her comments against approving the new broadcast technology that the transition period between ATSC 1.0 and ATSC 3.0 will create a period in which “consumers could find their bills going up because they will be stuck paying for two signals—even though their current television set can only receive one.” And after that? “It’s a tax on every household with a television,” she says. (Completely random side note: Rosenworcel's brother, Brian, is the drummer for the rock band Guster. Don't say I never offered you any random trivia.) On the other hand, it’s worth pointing out that the pain isn’t expected to be as dramatic as it was in 2009. In his 2016 article discussing the technical elements of a switchover, Sinclair’s Fred Baumgartner makes the case that a forced upgrade, if it ever happens, likely won’t be as dramatic because we already did the hard part by upgrading to digital in the first place. “In this case, the digital transition is history, we have flat screens and devices … and all that is missing is a means to connect broadcast TV to them,” he writes, adding that dongles that hook up to HDMI ports will likely be the way many people upgrade their sets. That said, dongles and set-top boxes won’t be the only upgrade path. At last year’s National Association of Broadcasters convention, the TV-maker LG showed off a unique kind of antenna that redistributes broadcast signals through a wireless router, which could help maximize the signal through devices that don’t already have an existing way to parse an ATSC signal. The approach would make it so that smartphones, tablets, and television sets would be able to use the antenna without dedicated internals, removing a major pain point of past antenna technology. There is some good here; there is some bad. But it’s possible that in just a few years, cutting the cord might mean something different than it does now. Whatever the strengths or weaknesses of ATSC 3.0, I think it’s important that we don’t lose sight of the fact that from a technological standpoint, this is an interesting time. Currently, there are experimental television stations running the new signals, including in Cleveland, where an experimental license from the FCC has allowed industry officials to work out the kinks of the technology. Currently, the National Association of Broadcasters and the Consumer Technology Association plan to staff a test station in the city in coming years to ensure everything’s working swimmingly. (The first to broadcast ATSC 3.0, however, was North Carolina's WRAL, shown above.) And some companies, like the aforementioned Sinclair Broadcasting, are jumping to go. “We are ‘off the plateau’ and ready to climb the next mountain along with our broadcast brethren, manufacturers, programmers and new business partners, looking down on wondrous new opportunities,” said the company’s executive chairman, David Smith. “There should only be upside for all concerned—including most importantly, the Public!” There’s a reason Sinclair is more excited than most about this upgrade. It’s the company thinking in the boldest terms about what it could mean for television. See, Sinclair, along with Nexstar Media Group and a few other companies, has discussed the idea of using the new standard for datacasting, which would allow for downstream data delivery through broadcast signals. To put this in layman’s terms, ATSC 3.0 could enable companies to speed up the download of heavily used content—say, Netflix—by letting users stream it from servers at their local TV station, rather than over the internet. And since the ATSC 3.0 protocol is designed to allow internet connections to communicate with broadcast signals, it’s not beyond the realm of possibility that we might someday see the possibility that Hulu or Netflix would be available as an over-the-air broadcast channel, weird as that sounds. This approach, as laid out, could open up a can of worms, however, effectively creating “fast lanes” for companies that can afford dedicated pipes offered by broadcasters, so it will be interesting to see where Sinclair and technology take that basic idea. But in this context, Sinclair’s high-profile attempt to purchase Tribune and get the FCC rules changed in its favor takes on a completely different tenor. Suddenly, buying Tribune seems less about owning the stations and more about potentially reshaping the way people use the internet. I don’t mean this to sound conspiratorial or even over-the-top. Rather, I just want to point out that this is a dramatic reframing of what we’ve come to expect from our TV sets. In many ways, this is as big a deal as net neutrality, because the shift is so dramatic—in many ways for good, in other ways that we should discuss before we buy in. Let’s get the static out of the way now.
  7. The war on piracy is never-ending, with a constant back and forth as to how harmful the theft of digital material can be on creators of the content in question. It seems that the Brazilian TV industry feels pretty strongly on the matter, causing a local YouTuber to be convicted over piracy tutorials. Piracy has never been more accessible than today, in which consumers simply have to boot up a “fully loaded Kodi box” to access content that would otherwise be restricted. Given its technical nature, this spawned a craze of tutorial content on how to achieve this from the software, which is particularly accessible with YouTube as a platform. Often, these videos are deemed as inconsequential in comparison to the developers making the wave of addons and applications, but Brazilian television group ‘Associação Brasileira de Televisões por Assinatura,’ or Brazilian Association of Television By Signature / ABTA as it would be in English, has had enough of the practice. Concerned over the rising influence that the YouTube star has, ABTA sought to set an example by targeting YouTube channel Café Tecnológico, ran by Marcelo Otto Nascimento. While the channel started off innocent enough, living up to the “Café” part of its name, it eventually embraced the “Tecnológico” side by tackling news and reviews of the latest set top box devices. Considering Nascimento has over 64,500 subscribers on his channel and a few thousand across social media profiles, it’s easier to see why ABTA would consider him a growing concern. ABTA has stated that the legal action it is taking against Nascimento is regarding his posting of ‘tutorials’ which “encourage the use of equipment and applications designed to allow access to services and content.” In turn, the group is seeking an apology and, of course, damages. Nascimento argued that his videos were simply comments on IPTV systems and that they do not breach copyright laws or cause any losses to television companies. Unfortunately for him, Judge Fernando Henrique de Oliveira Biolcati sees things differently, deeming his intent as solely to help people infringe copyright. “[T]he plain intention of the defendant was to guide users in order for them to obtain access to the restricted content of the applicant’s associates….while gaining advantages for this, especially via remuneration from the providers of the mentioned applications (YouTube and Facebook), proportional to the volumes of visitors,” ruled the Judge. “This is not a question of mere disinterested comments, in the exercise of freedom of expression.” The result is that Nascimento has to remove any and all content from Café Tecnológico that is deemed as instructional for pirates, as well as a restriction put in place to ensure no content of the same nature is uploaded again. On top of this, Nascimento has to pay $7,600 for “moral damages” alongside legal fees. It seems that ABTA isn’t stopping there, with plans to apply the same force if it catches anyone from its continued monitoring efforts. Nascimento has gone on to slate these efforts, stating that he would have simply removed the content if he was asked to and that he plans to appeal the decision.
  8. The digital rights groups behind the “Battle For The Net” alliance issued a call to both internet users and website operators to start protesting the FCC’s repeal of Obama-era net neutrality rules. The repeal is scheduled to happen only two days from now, on December 14. Repeal Of Net Neutrality The idea behind net neutrality is that internet users pay for internet packages from ISPs in order to get equal access to all websites. Every bit on the internet is treated as equal and neutral. Another way to see it is that under proper net neutrality rules there wouldn’t be discrimination from ISPs against certain types of content. For instance, the ISPs wouldn’t be able to say that certain news sites should get priority access on their networks, while other news sites wouldn’t. CNN wouldn't arrive faster to a user's device than The New York Times or the ISPs wouldn't deliver CNN data for free to the user, for example, while asking the user to pay for data when visiting the NYT. Other examples could include ISPs charging financial services websites more money because those types of business are more profitable and "they can afford it," and because it’s more “valuable” for those websites to reach their customers, than it is for other websites. In a market where there is little to no competition, and no net neutrality rules, this could be a possibility. Even before the current net neutrality rules passed in 2015, the ISPs were starting to ask video content companies for money in order to serve their content even at normal internet speeds. Services such as Netflix initially opposed that, and we started seeing Netflix video being throttled on some ISP networks. In other words, it didn't matter if the ISP customers paid for 20Mbps, 50Mbps, or 100Mbps connections. Netflix would still play poorly, even if it only needed 3Mbps to play the video at SD quality. This is what it means to allow the ISPs to discriminate against web services, become gatekeepers, and charge both customers and website services. This is what prompted Netflix to create its own internet speed test to show people that some ISPs aren’t giving them the speeds they are promising in their contracts. Verizon was caught capping Netflix speeds even recently, which is likely due to knowing that even if the rules are in place, the current FCC wouldn't enforce them. If ISPs start charging for access to their networks as well as to specific sites, then peer-to-peer connections may be seen as a pure money-losing operation to them. The ISPs may then start throttling P2P content such as torrents, cryptocurrencies, or even person-to-person file-sharing. SOPA-Style Protest Perhaps the most successful protest in the history of the internet against a law was the 2012 protest against the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), which promised to allow content makers to censor websites at will with a simple accusation of copyright infringement. The internet community—including individuals as well as large organizations such as Google and Wikipedia—joined in protest of the bill. Eventually most of SOPA's supporters (and its Senate equivalent, PIPA) in Congress changed sides and voted against the bill, signifying a win for the internet community. How To Join The Protest The “Battle For The Net” alliance, which was started by organizations such as Fight For The Future, Demand Progress, and Free Press, played a major role in getting the former FCC leadership to pass the net neutrality rules in the first place. The alliance, which has already been joined by dozens of websites, is now asking website owners and operators to join the new protest against the repeal of those net neutrality rules. It has also made it easy for websites to join the protest by developing ready-to-use alert prompts for their visitors. The code can be found on Battle For The Net’s website. Regular internet users can also participate in the protest by changing their profile pics to images recommended by the alliance on social media websites, by spreading the word about the repeal, as well via the many other creative ways to draw attention to the issue, all of which can be found on the alliance’s website. Some internet users may feel slightly inconvenienced by the protest, but that's the point—to show internet users that this is how their internet could become on a daily basis if the FCC is successful in repealing the net neutrality rules. If the protest does fail, and the FCC repeals the rules on December 14, then it will be up to Congress to restore them through law. Arguably, net neutrality laws should have been a law in the first place, rather than some executive-level rules that could be changed at will from one administration to another.
  9. TheGFT: News

    Translating Site / Financial News Site being translated to Swedish and Portuguese At this moment Kane is translating the site to Swedish and I am translating it to portuguese, if you would like to debug the site in those languages or help translating to another language please send me a PM. :-D Financial Update Thank you for all your donations, we have enough money to pay our december bills (one was payed and the other will be payed). But after we do that almost nothing will be left in our btc wallet, so please continue donating to help keep the site alive. Our bills are around 150 euros, but if we receive donations around 220/month we can get the MP3/XXX uploader back online.
  10. BJ-Share: News

    Our HOST of images is having problems, which affects the speed of the site. We are working to resolve.
  11. Facebook could be about to enter the sport streaming space, if a recent report is to be believed. Would you ditch your Sky Sports subscription or ‘Kodi box’ to live stream the Premier League or Ashes over the social network? The potentially game-changing news comes via a recent Sports Business Journal report, which says the social media giant is currently interviewing candidates for a role centred around negotiating global sport streaming rights. The article claims that the successful candidate will be given “a few billion dollars” to develop Facebook’s sport streaming ambitions, adding that the company previously bid $600 million (~£450 million) to try and secure Indian Premier League (IPL) cricket streaming rights, but was outbid. It’s the latest development in the intriguing world of modern media consumption, which sees mainstream TV networks fighting an uphill struggle against upstart streaming platforms like Kodi. As we’ve said before, Kodi is a perfectly legal piece of software, but its open-source nature mean it’s possible to augment it with piracy-enabling addons offering easy access to illegal sport, TV, and movie streams. We’ve also previously argued that the only way for traditional TV titans to truly ‘crackdown’ on Kodi is to offer an alternative that’s both affordable and far-reaching. In other words, to provide a stronger breadth of content at a fairer price point than what’s currently available from the likes of BT and Sky, whose offerings – especially when it comes to sport – are increasingly fragmented. Facebook would be a fascinating entry into this space and one with the resources to potentially disrupt how we consume big ticket sporting events. However, based on previous examples of Silicon Valley giants experimenting with sport streaming, we can’t say it would be the all-encompassing solution most fans crave – at least not at first. Twitter and Amazon, for example, have both flirted with sport streaming in the past couple of years, but their overtures have been decidedly limited, with both streaming Thursday night American football (NFL) games in 2016 and 2017, respectively. As baby steps go, it’s not to be sniffed at, but the fact remains that millions of sport fans all around the world are determined to watch their teams play each and every week – and that where viable legal streaming options aren’t available, they’re liable to stray into the ‘grey area’. That remains the problem. Is Facebook currently readying the solution?
  12. A YouTuber in Brazil has been prosecuted and fined for publishing videos that explain how people can pirate content online using IPTV devices. A TV industry group took exception to the man's tutorials and the Court agreed they served no other purpose than to help people infringe copyright. While piracy-focused tutorials have been around for many years, the advent of streaming piracy coupled with the rise of the YouTube star created a perfect storm online. Even a cursory search on YouTube now turns up thousands of Kodi addon and IPTV-focused channels, each vying to become the ultimate location for the latest and hottest piracy tips. While these videos don’t appear to be a priority for copyright holders, a channel operator in Brazil has just discovered that they aren’t without consequences. The case involves Marcelo Otto Nascimento, the operator of YouTube channel Café Tecnológico. It began, strangely, with videos about baking bread but later experimented with videos on technological topics including observations on streaming content without paying for it. In time, this attracted the negative attention of local TV industry group Associação Brasileira de Televisões por Assinatura (Brazilian Association of Television By Signature / ABTA). The group eventually took legal action, complaining about the nature of Nascimento’s YouTube and Facebook pages. ABTA told the court that Nascimento had been posting tutorials that “encourage the use of equipment and applications designed to allow access to services and content” of its members, despite that content being protected by copyright. The trade group called for the removal of the content, an injunction against Nascimento, an apology, plus compensation for “material and moral damages.” In his defense, Nascimento said that he merely comments on IPTV systems, does not breach copyright, doesn’t represent unfair competition, and did not cause the TV companies to incur any losses. Overall, Judge Fernando Henrique de Oliveira Biolcati did not agree with his assertions. “[T]he plain intention of the defendant was to guide users in order for them to obtain access to the restricted content of the applicant’s associates….while gaining advantages for this, especially via remuneration from the providers of the mentioned applications (YouTube and Facebook), proportional to the volumes of visitors,” the Judge wrote in his ruling. “This is not a question of mere disinterested comments, in the exercise of freedom of expression,” he added. As a result, Nascimento was ordered to remove all of his online content that could be deemed instructional for pirates, in order to protect the interests of ABTA’s members and their ability to earn revenue from their content. In addition, the channel operator was forbidden from publishing any more videos of a similar nature. On top, Nascimento must now pay the copyright holders for material damages, yet to be determined, measured from the posting of the first ‘pirate’ tutorial until such a date when all of the tutorials have been removed. The ruling (PDF via Mg, Portuguese) also requires Nascimento to pay the equivalent of US$7,600 for “moral damages” plus extra for legal costs, during the next 15 days. In a statement, ABTA said that following this conviction, more people could fall under the spotlight. “ABTA is also monitoring the activities of other channels on YouTube and on social networks that publish illegal content such as channel lists, movies and ‘free’ access TV series, as well as tutorials and comparisons of devices or applications intended for illicit use (such as Megabox, HtvBox, Kodi, Dejavu, IPTV, ITVGo, etc.),” the group said. Meanwhile, Nascimento says that he would’ve taken the videos down if only ABTA had asked him to. He will be appealing the decision, claiming that the videos did not teach people about piracy, they only demonstrated functionality. YouTube declined to comment. One of the remaining IPTV-focused videos https://torrentfreak.com/youtuber-convicted-for-publishing-video-piracy-tutorials-171212/
  13. Speaking of intellectual property (IP) protection, lawyers generally represent the rights holder, assisting him in establishing his IP rights in China and using such means as litigation, anti-counterfeiting actions, etc. to protect those rights. However, in numerous circumstances, the client may be in an unfavorable position in an IP conflict. For example, a foreign company has yet to enter the Chinese market but its trademark has already been pirated by another; when the foreign company’s products are about to enter the Chinese market, the pirate applies for customs seizure on the strength of the pirated trademark, or even institutes an infringement action as a means of demanding that the foreign company satisfies his monetary or business claim. Furthermore, a third party may claim that the client’s products or services constitute patent or copyright infringement. If such infringement claims are inadequately addressed, they could pose a fundamental obstacle to the development of the client’s business in China. Accordingly, responding to an IP conflict under adverse circumstances is also a subject of utmost importance. Generally speaking, responding to an IP conflict under adverse circumstances may be approached from a legal or business perspective. From a legal angle: once an IP conflict occurs and the other party asserts his rights, not only is it necessary to consider the IP itself that is embroiled in the conflict, but also to consider the response plan from multiple dimensions, such as other types of IP owned by the client, unfair competition, etc. In addition to passively responding to a suit or mounting a defense, a legal action to confirm non-infringement, or a countersuit or other manner of legal action can be considered in the response plan. For example, as mentioned above, when a customs seizure occurs or an infringement action is instituted after the pirating of a trademark, it is necessary to first analyze whether all of the client’s products are destined for export; if they are, consideration can, in light of the perspective recently expressed by the Supreme People’s Court on original equipment manufacturers, be given to mounting a non-infringement defence on the grounds that use as per the Trademark Law is not constituted. If the pirate has only carried out customs recordal, runs interference and stretches out the matter without instituting a legal action, consideration can be given to actively instituting a legal action to confirm non-infringement so as to squelch any future problems. In addition to responding to the infringement claim, it is also necessary to consider how to eliminate the basis on which the other party asserts the rights – for example, collecting evidence on the client’s prior rights and the other party’s bad faith in pirating the trademark so as to have the other party’s trademark invalidated on such grounds. If the other party has only registered the trademark without actually using it, consideration can also be given to the submission of an application for cancellation of the trademark on the grounds that it has not been used for three years. If the trademark has been registered for less than three years, a claim may be made in the other party’s assertion of rights for exemption from damages on the grounds that he has not actually used the trademark. In addition to the above mentioned responses addressing trademark rights, consideration can also be given to whether other IP rights owned by the client have been infringed by the other party and instituting the corresponding infringement claim to set off the other party’s claim. Of course, when in an adverse position in an IP conflict, in addition to considering the approaches set forth above, consideration can also be given to an unavoidable settlement. If other IP rights at hand as well as claims can be used as strong bargaining chips, compelling the other party to offer relatively favorable settlement conditions, this should not be frowned upon as an unfavorable outcome. Even in the absence of a persuasive bargaining chip at hand, as a legal action or other manner of dispute resolution process is time and energy consuming for both parties, bringing the amount of time, energy and expenses that will be spent during the procedure to the attention of the other party in negotiations may also result in a relatively acceptable settlement outcome at an earlier stage. In addition to legal solutions, commercial solutions will sometimes have an unexpected effect when responding to an IP conflict under adverse circumstances. In judicial practice, the parties in a substantial number of cases are inextricably linked to a greater or lesser extent. While considering a legal solution, designing a solution that takes into account a balancing of the business interests of the client and the other party can at times generate a result that far exceeds that of a unitary legal solution. The author once acted as counsel for a certain foreign client, the defendant, in a patent infringement case. Although the infringement was not deliberate, because the scope of the other party’s patent claims was relatively broad, the client had lost in an infringement action at first instance before the author took over the case. The client had sought to invalidate the patent, but this claim had also been dismissed and the client lost in the administrative procedure at first instance. After analyzing the client’s potential legal defences and solutions, the author concluded that pursuing further litigation under such a circumstance was unlikely to result in a better outcome. Also, as the client’s products had been subjected to preservation by the other party, the loss that would result from unsuccessful litigation would be unbearable. Thereupon, the author set to work based on the previously existing and future potential business cooperation relationship between the client and the other party in the Chinese market, designed a business negotiation plan for the client and guided the negotiations with the other party. Finally, as the business plan proposed by the client would be beneficial to both parties in future, the other party ultimately withdrew its infringement action and licensed its patent to the client until the expiration of the patent term at a very low rate. In short, for an enterprise to establish an effective IP system in China, not only does it require sound rights establishment, protection and infringement pursuit mechanisms, but it also needs to guard against infringement claims made by others and have a plan to respond to an IPconflict under adverse circumstances.
  14. As long as ISPs say how they’re screwing things up it’s no big deal! A draft agreement announced by the FCC and FTC today outlines how the agencies will work together after net neutrality is killed. Under the plan the FCC will review complaints from consumers about ISPs, and determine if they are disclosing bad behavior like blocking or throttling content. The FTC will also investigate these disclosures, to make sure they are disclosures. Then, they will do nothing about the actual bad behavior. The FCC is expected to vote on Thursday to replace net neutrality with a plan that makes no sense. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai wants to let ISPs regulate themselves and kick his agency’s regulatory authority to the FTC. Pai’s plan is to have regulators at the FTC look closely to make sure bad behavior is buried somewhere in an ISP’s terms of service agreement. This plan is a joke that doesn’t take the real world seriously. Pai thinks the FCC screwed up when it tried to stop Comcast from blocking BitTorrent in 2008, and he expects there’s a chance that ISPs will cause similar harm to consumers if his ironically-named “Internet Freedom Order” takes effect. (Of course he expects that, because ISPs do bad stuff all the time, and they’re consistently ranked by consumers as among the worst companies in America.) The idea that ISPs are going to regulate themselves would be hilarious, were it just a joke and not the impending policy of the US government that’s being implemented by a former lawyer for Verizon.
  15. A group of sites plan to take action to draw attention to a crucial FCC vote planned for Dec. 14 that could dismantle Obama-era net neutrality rules. A lot of the tech industry is not happy. A group of activists and websites including Imgur, Mozilla, Pinterest, Reddit, GitHub, Etsy, BitTorrent and Pornhub are planning a campaign Tuesday to draw attention to an upcoming FCC vote that could radically reshape the way the internet works. As part of the effort, organizers at Fight for the Future say activists will change their relationship status on social media to "'Married" (to net neutrality).'" They might also add "Defending Net Neutrality" as a new job. Meanwhile, sites are expected to run high-profile ads and post notes to users encouraging them to lobby the FCC over the vote, which occurs on Dec. 14. Reddit has already added a list of US legislators who received money from the telecommunications industry to its front page. Tuesday's campaign is the latest effort by activists to dissuade the FCC from repealing Obama-era rules that effectively classified internet service providers as utilities. The classification, known as Title II, forced companies like Verizon, AT&T and Comcast to treat all internet traffic equally. Last week, protesters marched outside Verizon stores around the US. Earlier, a handful of tech trailblazers -- including Vint Cerf, a founding figure of the internet; Steve Wozniak, a co-founder of Apple; and Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World Wide Web -- posted an open letter on Tumblr criticizing the proposed repeal of net neutrality. "The FCC's rushed and technically incorrect proposed order to abolish net neutrality protections without any replacement is an imminent threat to the Internet we worked so hard to create," the letter said. "It should be stopped." (To learn more about net neutrality, read CNET's FAQ on the subject here.) Reversing net neutrality rules, one of the Trump Administration's most dramatic deregulatory moves yet, could allow internet providers to begin charging more for access to certain sites, activists warn. "The unprecedented public backlash to the FCC's plan to slash Title II net neutrality protections continues to grow," the group said. The FCC did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
  16. Chennai: The Crime Branch-CID of Tamil Nadu police has registered an FIR against piracy websites Tamilrockers and Tamildbox based on a complaint by an office bearer of the Tamil Film Producers council. According to sources, the makers of the movie, 'Ippadai Vellum'starring Udhayanidhi Stalin approached the police after the movie was released online. Rajasekaran N from the Tamil film producers council lodged a complaint against the website almost a month later the movie ‘Ippadai Vellum’ was released. In the FIR, Rajasekaran said that the movie was allegedly sold in DVDs and in the website which came as a big hit to the producers of the movie.
  17. Happy Hanukkah 2017 Let's be happy, let us cheer, Hanukkah again is here. All the lights are shining bright, Isn't it a lovely sight? You know these lights remind us Of the time long, long ago, When God caused one, tiny light, for eight long days to shine so bright. // So say we all
  18. A YouTuber in Brazil has been prosecuted and fined for publishing videos that explain how people can pirate content online using IPTV devices. A TV industry group took exception to the man's tutorials and the Court agreed they served no other purpose than to help people infringe copyright. While piracy-focused tutorials have been around for many years, the advent of streaming piracy coupled with the rise of the YouTube star created a perfect storm online. Even a cursory search on YouTube now turns up thousands of Kodi addon and IPTV-focused channels, each vying to become the ultimate location for the latest and hottest piracy tips. While these videos don’t appear to be a priority for copyright holders, a channel operator in Brazil has just discovered that they aren’t without consequences. The case involves Marcelo Otto Nascimento, the operator of YouTube channel Café Tecnológico. It began, strangely, with videos about baking bread but later experimented with videos on technological topics including observations on streaming content without paying for it. In time, this attracted the negative attention of local TV industry group Associação Brasileira de Televisões por Assinatura (Brazilian Association of Television By Signature / ABTA). The group eventually took legal action, complaining about the nature of Nascimento’s YouTube and Facebook pages. ABTA told the court that Nascimento had been posting tutorials that “encourage the use of equipment and applications designed to allow access to services and content” of its members, despite that content being protected by copyright. The trade group called for the removal of the content, an injunction against Nascimento, an apology, plus compensation for “material and moral damages.” In his defense, Nascimento said that he merely comments on IPTV systems, does not breach copyright, doesn’t represent unfair competition, and did not cause the TV companies to incur any losses. Overall, Judge Fernando Henrique de Oliveira Biolcati did not agree with his assertions. “[T]he plain intention of the defendant was to guide users in order for them to obtain access to the restricted content of the applicant’s associates….while gaining advantages for this, especially via remuneration from the providers of the mentioned applications (YouTube and Facebook), proportional to the volumes of visitors,” the Judge wrote in his ruling. “This is not a question of mere disinterested comments, in the exercise of freedom of expression,” he added. As a result, Nascimento was ordered to remove all of his online content that could be deemed instructional for pirates, in order to protect the interests of ABTA’s members and their ability to earn revenue from their content. In addition, the channel operator was forbidden from publishing any more videos of a similar nature. On top, Nascimento must now pay the copyright holders for material damages, yet to be determined, measured from the posting of the first ‘pirate’ tutorial until such a date when all of the tutorials have been removed. The ruling (PDF via Mg, Portuguese) also requires Nascimento to pay the equivalent of US$7,600 for “moral damages” plus extra for legal costs, during the next 15 days. In a statement, ABTA said that following this conviction, more people could fall under the spotlight. “ABTA is also monitoring the activities of other channels on YouTube and on social networks that publish illegal content such as channel lists, movies and ‘free’ access TV series, as well as tutorials and comparisons of devices or applications intended for illicit use (such as Megabox, HtvBox, Kodi, Dejavu, IPTV, ITVGo, etc.),” the group said. Meanwhile, Nascimento says that he would’ve taken the videos down if only ABTA had asked him to. He will be appealing the decision, claiming that the videos did not teach people about piracy, they only demonstrated functionality. YouTube declined to comment. One of the remaining IPTV-focused videos
  19. Hollywood’s lobbyist in chief, Charles Rivkin Tuesday delivered a message of hope for the theatrical cinema industry, in Asia and the rest of the world. The chairman and CEO of the Motion Picture Association, Rivkin suggested that film has enduring cultural power, as well as the power to make cross cultural connections. “Audiences across Asia are devouring American content.. it is our responsibility to continue creating compelling content, and nurturing talent,” he said. Rivkin was speaking in Hong Kong at the CineAsia, the largest annual convention of cinema exhibitors and distributors in Asia. Rivkin’s upbeat message comes at a time when theatrical cinema is challenged by online platforms, shrinking release windows, and changing retail patterns. Asia, however, represents a different outlook. It is already the largest segment of the world’s theatrical market, representing 39% of global box office, and offers the strongest growth prospects. “Asia is setting the pace of cinema building,” said Rivkin, citing China’s 20 screens per day building pace. “These new theaters are being built to meet modern-day demands.” He cited the addition of bars and laser projection as adding to consumer comfort and attraction. Inevitably, Rivkin included a warning on movie piracy. “We need to do more to compete with the increasingly prevalent issue of global piracy. That requires a global response. He cited survey figures that show 24% of adults in Australia admitting to using piracy to access content. That figure rises to 39% in supposedly law-abiding Singapore. He encouraged Asian companies to join the six MPA studios and 22 other member companies in Alliance for Creativity and Entertainment (ACE). According to the MPA’s data box office in the Asia-Pacific region was worth $14.6 billion in 2016, ahead of the $11.4 billion of North America. The Asian figures are expected to have grown again, with China growing a predicted 15% in 2017 and adding more than $1 billion to the total.
  20. East African Community (EAC) member states are set to harmonize their laws to boost cooperation in the fight against music piracy, an official said on Monday. Kenya Film and Classification Board (KFCB) CEO Ezekiel Mutua told a media briefing in Nairobi that partner states have already developed draft policies and legislation that will be forwarded to the East African Legislative Assembly for enactment. "The goal is to have uniform laws that will guide cooperation in combating music piracy that is responsible for stifling growth of the sector," Mutua said. The EAC comprises Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda, Tanzania, Burundi and South Sudan. Mutua said that once the economic bloc has a unified legal regime, it will reduce the level of music piracy in the region and help boost artists' earnings, noting that growing regional integration has led to an increase in cross-border trade of music. He said some of the trade involves pirated music moving from one partner state to another by criminal syndicates taking advantage of weak national laws. Mutua noted that digital technology has contributed to the proliferation of pirated music because it enables unauthorized copies of music. Low purchasing power in the region has also made piracy rampant, he said. The Kenyan film content regulator is currently conducting a national awareness campaign to educate artists on how to prevent them from being victims of music piracy, Mutua said.
  21. A global alliance of entertainment companies has filed an injunction against Kodi set-top box maker TickBox TV. Torrent Freak published a detailed review of the Alliance for Creativity and Entertainment’s (ACE) filing. ACE has demanded that TickBox TV push software updates that erase its package of illicit add-ons and that it impound any unsold devices it has in inventory. Studios Organize Global Anti-Piracy Actions ACE is comprised of more than thirty entertainment companies from the US, Canada, Europe, and India. It formed earlier this year to present a united, global front in the industry’s fight against content piracy. The alliance claims that in 2016 pirated video sites received more than twenty-one billion visits, which produced over five billion illegal downloads of movies and TV shows. TickBox was the alliance’s first target in the United States. ACE also worked with Australian regulators to shut down a Melbourne-based Kodi set-top box maker that supplied pirated content to the Asian market. This follows a wave of other civil and criminal actions in Europe. British Kodi set-top box seller Brian Thompson received an 18-month suspended prison sentence in October. UK authorities caught him selling devices preloaded with pirated content and unauthorized access to Premier League soccer matches. In May, the European Union’s Court of Justice declared that even linking to pirated content counts as piracy. That makes piracy-enabling add-ons just as illegal as pirated DVDs. Expect to see more lawsuits and criminal investigations in 2018 as the entertainment industry’s legal machine ramps up. TickBox TV is just the first skirmish in ACE’s battle.
  22. Yesterday
  23. Tracker's Name: Blues-Brothers Genre: MOVIES / GENERAL Sign-up: http://blues-brothers.biz/signup.php Additional information: Blues-Brothers is a Private Torrent Tracker for MOVIES / GENERAL
  24. Tracker's Name: Blues-Brothers Genre: MOVIES / GENERAL Sign-up: http://blues-brothers.biz/signup.php Additional information: Blues-Brothers is a Private Torrent Tracker for MOVIES / GENERAL
  25. A massive list of 72 AACS 2.0 keys is circulating on the Internet, allowing people to rip previously well-protected UHD Blu-ray discs. The leak is a massive setback for Hollywood and the licensing company AACS LA, who have done everything in their power to keep UHD discs secure. Nowadays, movie buffs and videophiles find it hard to imagine a good viewing experience without UHD content, but disc rippers and pirates have remained on the sidelines for a long time. Protected with strong AACS 2.0 encryption, UHD Blu-ray discs have long been one of the last bastions movie pirates had yet to breach. This year there have been some major developments on this front, as full copies of UHD discs started to leak online. While it remained unclear how these were ripped, it was a definite milestone. Just a few months ago another breakthrough came when a Russian company released a Windows tool called DeUHD that could rip UHD Blu-ray discs. Again, the method for obtaining the keys was not revealed. Now there’s another setback for AACS LA, the licensing outfit founded by Warner Bros, Disney, Microsoft, Intel, and others. On various platforms around the Internet, copies of 72 AACS 2.0 keys are being shared. The first mention we can find was posted a few days ago in a ten-year-old forum thread in the Doom9 forums. Since then it has been replicated a few times, without much fanfare. The keys The keys in question are confirmed to work and allow people to rip UHD Blu-ray discs of movies with freely available software such as MakeMKV. They are also different from the DeUHD list, so there are more people who know how to get them. The full list of leaked keys includes movies such as Deadpool, Hancock, Passengers, Star Trek: Into Darkness, and The Martian. Some movies have multiple keys, likely as a result of different disc releases. The leaked keys are also relevant for another reason. Ten years ago, a hacker leaked the AACS cryptographic key “09 F9” online which prompted the MPAA and AACS LA to issue DMCA takedown requests to sites where it surfaced. This escalated into a censorship debate when Digg started removing articles that referenced the leak, triggering a massive backlash. Thus fas the response to the AACS 2.0 leaks has been pretty tame, but it’s still early days. A user who posted the leaked keys on MyCehas already removed them due to possible copyright problems, so it’s definitely still a touchy subject. The question that remains now is how the hacker managed to secure the keys, and if AACS 2.0 has been permanently breached. https://torrentfreak.com/treasure-trove-of-aacs-2-0-uhd-blu-ray-keys-leak-online-171211/
  26. PHILADELPHIA – The owner of several adult films alleges an unknown BitTorrent user has distributed more than two dozen films unlawfully. Strike 3 Holdings LLC filed a complaint on Nov. 17 in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania against John Doe subscriber assigned IP address 76.99.66.179 alleging copyright infringement. According to the complaint, the plaintiff alleges that it was damaged from having 25 of its motion pictures distributed without its consent by the defendant. The plaintiff alleges it has used geolocation software to trace the defendant's IP address to this court's district. The plaintiff holds John Doe subscriber assigned IP address 76.99.66.179 responsible because the defendant allegedly used the BitTorrent software to download and make unauthorized copies of plaintiff's motion pictures. The plaintiff requests a trial by jury and seeks to enjoin the defendant from further infringing plaintiff's copyrighted works, order the defendant to delete and permanently remove digital files relating to the plaintiff, statutory damages, court costs and any further relief the court grants. It is represented by Andrew W. Bonekemper and Christian Moffitt of Fox Rothschild LLP in Blue Bell.
  27. S Durga director Sanal Kumar Sasidharan said piracy is the primary difficulty, while actress Maheen Mirza said the problems filmmakers faced were similar to the problems farmers and weavers faced. The different platforms available to independent filmmakers to market their films were discussed at length at a panel discussion, moderated by well-known filmmaker Jiju Antony, on the third day of the first Kazhcha Indie Film Festival (KIFF) at the Lenin Balavadi in Thiruvananthapuram. Several other issues associated with the marketing of films, such as the need for viewers to have an active role in sharing information about independent films and the threat posed by piracy, were discussed by the panel which comprised eminent director Bijukumar Damodaran (popularly known in Kerala as Dr Biju), Maheen Mirza of the Ektara Collective, director Pushpendra Singh and Sanal Kumar Sasidharan, director of the controversial S Durga. Participating in the discussion, Dr Biju said, "The biggest difficulty independent filmmakers face is with regard to how they can sell their movies. Many think they can recover their money if their films get into festivals. However, it is very difficult to get entry into film festivals because even in small countries they are making good films now. It has been around 20 years since an Indian film won in the competitive section of the Cannes, Berlin or Venice film festivals." The veteran went on to give hope to independent filmmakers by saying there are multiple other ways for them to get their money back. "Sometimes we get back the money if we win an award," he said. "Over the last four or five years, opportunities to market the films have been coming because of internet platforms like Amazon or Netflix. Also, the educational platform is another source. If the film is specifically made for educational purposes, it could be used by institutions such as university libraries, which screen them for a nominal sum. Then, as we know, there is the festival platform. Apart from these three platforms, there is the option of making DVDs." Jiju then raised the question of how aspiring filmmakers could get their films into festivals. Won't their films be lost in the thousands of other films seeking to gain entry into festivals like Cannes? Sanal Kumar responded, "We have to close our eyes to that side and see if there is any opportunity available. It is difficult to get entry into a film festival. You try to send your films to festivals, but you can't say every movie of yours will make it to a festival. Rather, we must look to use the market in India. "Here, we have a lot of potential but have failed to use it," he continued. "We don't know where to sell and how. People want to see every film released. If you ask viewers to pay just Rs10, which is the price of a cup of tea, and if you make a film which is in the range of Rs25 to 30 lakh, you can recover the money." Recounting his own experience, he said, "When Sexy Durga was first shown in a film bazaar, my sales agent liked the film and told the CEO. However, the CEO said it was 'dark'. After we got selected in Rotterdam, they wanted to sell. I still haven't got any money from my sales agent. My opinion is that we will stand to gain much more if we explore our own soil." Director Singh added to the discussion by citing his own experiences. "It is difficult to get distributors for the kind of films I make," he admitted. "Not even Netflix bought it. If you think a film festival is a big ticket to selling, then you are mistaken. Especially if you are dealing in regional cinema. "Let me talk about my film. It was a two-hour film in black and white. My agent said they had managed to sell only one black and white film so far and that too because it had won awards and was by a famous director. I was inspired by an Israeli filmmaker who suggested that there is another platform called the art of slow films. They have a VoD [video-on-demand platform] to sell slow films. We have to focus on our artistic practice and find the right audience. He says if you are an independent filmmaker, you will have to find an independent way to sell your films. He says there should be a network of independent filmmakers who then should look at venues where they can find audiences for each other." Providing another perspective, actress Mirza said the problems filmmakers face are similar to those •farmers and weavers face. "It is a universal problem," she said. "We produce films and they produce food. We do not know where to sell. With the advent of technology, more people are getting to make films. But who will watch the films? So, an agency comes in as an intermediary, but they want it exclusively. So the people and the masses for whom it is meant can't access it. What we need is a movement that will give people access to the films." Dr Biju pointed out that in many countries there are dedicated theatres for screening arthouse films. Viewers get opportunities to watch rare films and filmmakers get some money, he said. In India, however, he said such a movement is non-existent. "There are people who want to watch rare films. There may not be a huge crowd, but they are there," he said. "It is starting in Kerala. Theatres exclusively for screening independent movies have come up in Kerala. They should come up in other states as well." Singh said that with KIFF, independent filmmakers had made a start. "KIFF is by a filmmaker. We have taken ownership," he asserted. There were suggestions from the audience as well on how the onus has to be on viewers, who have to take the initiative to take such movies to their respective villages and towns. It was left to Sanal Kumar to offer a practical, low-cost suggestion and raise a serious problem. "We need not screen our films to large groups," he said. "Even if we can show the film to 50 people at a time and have such screenings in 200 places across the country, I think that will be a start. "The primary difficulty we face is piracy. People think independent films are free. Even if you ask for Rs10, people feel offended. They don't mind paying several times more to watch big stars. "There are some people who consider it their duty to upload our content on the internet. It is necessary that we stop people from uploading this on the internet free. Also, we must ask people to pay. It can even be Re1, but people will not pay if you don't ask. Also, when we give our films to film clubs for screening, they should make sure the films do not go out."
  28. Open: T411 | GENERAL

    Tracker Name: T411 Genre: General Sign-up Link: http://hd-sportbits.org/user/register Closing Date: Soon, So Hurry! Additional Information: HD-SportsBit Has Moved To T411 Torrent Tracker. T411 is General Torrent Tracker Made In FRANCE.
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