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  1. Today
  2. Tracker's Name: HD-Forever (HD-F) Genre: HD MOVIES Sign-up: https://hdf.world/register.php Additional information: HD-Forever (HD-F) is a FRENCH Private Torrent Tracker for HD MOVIES
  3. Yesterday
  4. The Premier League has sent a rather unfortunate takedown notice to Google. The football organization wants the search engine to take down Facebook's homepage, claiming that it distributes copyright infringing content. Google has investigated the unusual censorship effort and decided not to take any action in response. Removing search results is nothing new for Google. The company has been cleaning up its search index for years, in response to complaints from copyright holders. Every week the search engine processes millions of requests. In most cases these claims are legitimate, but every now and then innocent web pages are mistakenly targeted. This week we stumbled upon a takedown notice that’s clearly not right. The request was sent by NetResult on behalf of the Premier League, and targets a wide variety of sports streaming related sites. “The reported URLs are offering unauthored live streams of Premier League content,” it reads, listing the homepages of sites such as streamsarena.eu, letsfooty.com, tvlink.in and sportcategory.com. While targeting the homepages of these sites is already quite broad, it also lists the main Facebook.com URL among the infringing domains, asking Google to remove it from the search engine entirely. Premier League Takedown Notice Google has investigated the claims, including the Facebook one, but decided not to comply with the notice in question, leaving Facebook’s homepage in search results. In situations like this, we can see how easy erroneous takedown claims can easily lead to over-blocking. It’s good to know that, despite receiving millions of requests per day, the search engine is still able to spot most of these flaws. Unfortunately, however, not all mistakes are easily caught, especially when they concern smaller sites. Just a few days ago we noticed that a page from the copyright troll blog DieTrollDie was removed from Google’s search results because it mentioned a torrent hash of a Lionsgate film, and another blog had several court filings removed from the results for the same reason. https://torrentfreak.com/premier-league-asks-google-to-take-down-facebooks-homepage-170429/
  5. The Premier League has sent a rather unfortunate takedown notice to Google. The football organization wants the search engine to take down Facebook's homepage, claiming that it distributes copyright infringing content. Google has investigated the unusual censorship effort and decided not to take any action in response. Removing search results is nothing new for Google. The company has been cleaning up its search index for years, in response to complaints from copyright holders. Every week the search engine processes millions of requests. In most cases these claims are legitimate, but every now and then innocent web pages are mistakenly targeted. This week we stumbled upon a takedown notice that’s clearly not right. The request was sent by NetResult on behalf of the Premier League, and targets a wide variety of sports streaming related sites. “The reported URLs are offering unauthored live streams of Premier League content,” it reads, listing the homepages of sites such as streamsarena.eu, letsfooty.com, tvlink.in and sportcategory.com. While targeting the homepages of these sites is already quite broad, it also lists the main Facebook.com URL among the infringing domains, asking Google to remove it from the search engine entirely. Premier League Takedown Notice Google has investigated the claims, including the Facebook one, but decided not to comply with the notice in question, leaving Facebook’s homepage in search results. In situations like this, we can see how easy erroneous takedown claims can easily lead to over-blocking. It’s good to know that, despite receiving millions of requests per day, the search engine is still able to spot most of these flaws. Unfortunately, however, not all mistakes are easily caught, especially when they concern smaller sites. Just a few days ago we noticed that a page from the copyright troll blog DieTrollDie was removed from Google’s search results because it mentioned a torrent hash of a Lionsgate film, and another blog had several court filings removed from the results for the same reason. https://torrentfreak.com/premier-league-asks-google-to-take-down-facebooks-homepage-170429/
  6. Tracker's Name: Blutopia (blu-bits) Genre: HD MOVIES / TV Sign-up: https://blutopia.xyz/signup Additional information: Blutopia (blu-bits) is a Private Torrent Tracker for HD MOVIES / TV
  7. Reboot Your Brain - Some Need It More Than Others ! The Vault is back - Deep Breath Ah ! After all the stress of the last couple of weeks we feel you need a brain reboot (not transplant, well not quite yet anyway ) So Our Torrent of the Week is John Reese - Reboot Your Brain Method which you can get HERE Please discuss this torrent and any methods you find have worked for you in gaining mental strength, focus or simply resetting your brain and overcoming mental blocks or stress below. Discuss HERE I will start be adding I find meditation helps me alot.
  8. This week the European Court of Justice found that set-top boxes and similar devices can infringe copyright if they are sold pre-configured for piracy. The Court also clarified that when users stream content from an illegal source, they too fall foul of the law. So with these issues in mind, how is the market likely to respond? On Wednesday, the European Court of Justice handed down its decision in the long-running case between Dutch anti-piracy group BREIN and Filmspeler.nl. Filmspeler sold Android-type devices with Kodi software installed. However, it augmented otherwise legal setups with third-party addons designed to deliver infringing content to customers. Filmspeler’s owners felt that its pre-configured devices were legal, but both BREIN and ultimately the ECJ disagreed, with the latter noting that their sale amounted to a “communication to the public” in respect of infringing content. So what does this decision mean for the sale of so-called “fully-loaded” devices in the EU? In the very short term, probably very little. Longer term, some changes probably lie ahead. Suppliers There can be little doubt that one of the first places people turn to for such devices are places like eBay. But despite some recent UK tabloid claims that the auction site had banned their sale, a cursory search today reveals hundreds of listings for devices that are clearly configured for piracy. Over time – whether due to eBay tightening its policies, more aggressive reporting of infringing listings by rights holders, or increased caution on the part of sellers due to prosecutions – it’s likely that these kinds of blatant ‘pirate’ listings will become much less common. However, sellers will find subtle ways to get their message across, without attracting too much attention. For instance, people hoping to watch satellite TV without paying for an expensive subscription can head over to eBay and pop the otherwise benign terms “satellite” and “gift” into the search box. Hundreds of listings appear, the majority of which offer a pirate subscription to an illegal card-sharing service. ‘Pirate’ box sellers are likely to employ similar tactics in future. While sprawling, eBay is relatively easy to police but the same cannot be said of the listings that appear in local classified papers. These ads are often placed by regular people who have nurtured a small cottage industry selling a few boxes per week. These people could find themselves targeted by authorities, but sheer numbers will dictate that most fly under the radar. For suppliers still intent on shifting volume, safer strategies exist. Pirate addons? Get ready for a DIY boom This week’s ECJ ruling has nothing to do with the sale of basic hardware and everything to do with infringing software. In other words, if box suppliers sell devices with little other than an operating system installed, they are not breaking the law. This presents a problem, however. A typical ‘pirate’ box buyer hasn’t got the knowledge to turn an Android device into a piracy machine, that’s why he bought the thing off eBay in the first instance. This means that these kinds of people will be much less likely to buy if they have to mess around themselves. However, if they only have to click a couple of links to get going, that probably won’t be too much of a problem. That’s certainly the case with native Android apps such as Showbox, Popcorn Time, Mobdro, and Terrarium TV, which are all installed to a set-top device with a couple of clicks, even by the complete novice. With this in mind, it’s likely that sellers will very gently direct customers to sites offering the software and tutorials, rather than take the risk themselves. Custom installers for Kodi (such as TVAddons’ Fusion) are also widely available and will no doubt gain further traction if the availability of pre-configured ‘pirate’ boxes is restricted. Expect there to be a lot of innovation in this area, with an emphasis on making this as close to a ‘one-click’ process as possible. But will users be breaking the law using these setups? In a word – probably. Up until this week, it was widely believed that users who merely stream pirated content are not breaking the law. It was a position even held by UK Trading Standards, who have an important prosecution pending against a box seller. But the ECJ’s decision published on Wednesday appears to have removed all doubt, noting that a “copyright-protected work obtained by streaming from a website belonging to a third party offering that work without the consent of the copyright holder” does not qualify for exemption from reproduction rights. In other words, streaming copyrighted content from an illicit source is now just as illegal in the EU as downloading from an illicit source. So what does this mean for the average ‘pirate’ box user? In the short term, probably not a great deal. When a user downloads or streams infringing content, whether that’s from a file-hosting site, streaming portal, or even YouTube, no third parties are legally able to get in the way to monitor what’s going on. The user’s connection is directly communicating with the source, and unlike BitTorrent, there are no easily monitored and potentially risky uploads going on. So yes, streaming is now apparently confirmed illegal but will remain a hidden offense carried out by dozens of millions of people all around the EU. Even in the face of an ECJ ruling, only their consciences will stand between them and illicit content, whether a box seller installed the addons, or if they did the deed themselves. https://torrentfreak.com/what-now-for-pirate-boxes-streaming-following-the-ecj-ruling-170429/
  9. Tracker's Name: Speedtorrent-Tracker Genre: General Sign-up Link: http://speedtorrent-tracker.mine.nu/signup.php Closing date: N/A Additional information: Speedtorrent-Tracker is a GERMAN Private Torrent Tracker for MOVIES / GENERAL
  10. Selling

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  11. Last week
  12. A hacking group calling itself TheDarkOverlord is threatening to leak a trove of unreleased TV shows and movies. The group has already backed up its warning by uploading the season five premiere of Netflix's Orange is The New Black. The group says it obtained the content from a post-production studio and after the company failed to pay a ransom, spilled it onto torrent sites. Much to the disappointment of studios everywhere, movie and TV shows leak onto the Internet every single week. However, if what is unfolding today lives up to its billing, we could be looking at the start of one of the most significant piracy leaks of recent times. Earlier this evening, the first episode of the brand new season of Netflix’s Orange is the New Black was uploaded to The Pirate Bay, months ahead of its official June release date. So how did this unreleased content fall into the wrong hands? As seen from the torrent details uploaded to Pirate Bay, the leak is the work of a hacking entity calling itself TheDarkOverlord (TDO). An extraction of the .torrent file’s meta data reveals a 1.1GB file named: ‘Episode1/ORANGEep5001_HDSR_CTM_ProResProxy_8.15.16-H264_SD_16x9.mov’. In information sent to TF, the group says that sometime during the closing months of 2016, it gained access to the systems of Larson Studios, an ADR (additional dialogue recorded) studio, based in Hollywood. The following screenshot reportedly from the leak indeed suggests a copy that was in production and possibly unfinished in some way. After obtained its haul, TDO says it entered into “negotiations” with the video services company over the fate of the liberated content. “After we had a copy of their data safely in our possession, we asked that we be paid a small fee in exchange for non-disclosure. We approached them on the Eve of their Christmas,” a member of the group previously told us over an encrypted channel. So who are TDO? According to several security reports, TDO is a fairly prolific hacking group (their spokesman says they are more than one) that has claimed responsibility for a number of attacks in recent months. One, which targeted construction company Pre-Con Products Ltd, involved the leak of contracts and a video which purported to show a fatal accident. Another, concerning polyurethane and epoxy product company GS Polymers, Inc, resulted in a leak of data after the company reportedly showed a “disinterest” in “working” with TDO. The group has also targeted medical organizations and leaked gigabytes of data obtained from Gorilla Glue. As is clear from its actions, TDO takes its business seriously and when the group allegedly contacted Larson Studios before Christmas, they had extortion (their word) in mind. In a lengthy business-like ‘contract’ shared with TorrentFreak, TDO laid out its terms for cooperation with the California-based company. “This agreement of accord, assurances, and satisfaction is between Larson Studios (the ‘Client’) and thedarkoverlord, a subsidiary of TheDarkOverlord Solutions, a subsidiary of World Wide Web, LLC [WWW, LLC] (the ‘Proposer’),” the wordy contract begins. In section 2 of the contract, headed “Description of Services,” TheDarkOverLord offers to “refrain from communicating in any method, design, or otherwise to any individual, corporation, computer, or other entity any knowledge, information, or otherwise,” which appears to be an offer not to leak the content obtained. Unsurprisingly, there were a number of conditions. The subsequent section 3 reveals that the “services” come at a price – 50 bitcoins – plus potential late payment fees, at TDO’s discretion. TDO informs TF that Larson Studios agreed to the pay the ransom and even sent back the contract. “They printed, signed, and scanned the contract back to us,” the group says. A copy seen by TF does have a signature, but TDO claims that Larson failed to follow through with the all-important bitcoin payment by the deadline of 31st December. That resulted in follow-up contact with the company. “A late fee was levied and they still didn’t hold up their end of the agreement,” TDO says. In an earlier discussion with TDO after the group reached out to us, we tried to establish what makes a group like this tick. Needless to say, they gave very little away. We got the impression from news reports that the group is mostly motivated by money, possibly power, but to remove doubt we asked the question. “Are you familiar with the famous American bank robber, Willie Sutton?” a spokesperson replied. “In an interview, he was once asked ‘Why do you rob banks?’ To which replied, ‘Because that’s where the money is.’ It’s said that this exchange led to the creation of Sutton’s law which states that when diagnosing, one should consider the obvious. We’ll leave you to interpret what we’re motivated by.” Later, the group stated that its only motivation is its “greed for internet money.” TorrentFreak understands that the leak of this single episode could represent just the start of an even bigger drop of pre-release TV series and movies. TDO claims to be sitting on a massive trove of unreleased video material, all of it high-quality. “The quality is almost publish quality. One will find small audio errors and video errors like lack of color correction, but things are mostly complete with most of the material,” TDO says. TheDarkOverlord did not explain what it hopes to achieve by leaking this video content now, months after it was obtained. However, when questioned the group told us that the information shared with us thus far represents just “the tip of the iceberg.” In the past few minutes the group has taken to its Twitter account, posting messages directed at Netflix who are likely to be watching events unfold. Update: The group has published a statement on Pastebin. Update: Season 5 has been leaked in full on The Pirate Bay. https://torrentfreak.com/hackers-leak-netflixs-orange-is-the-new-black-season-5-premiere-170429/
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  14. A new DMCA subpoena has ordered Cloudflare to expose the person who manages the account of private torrent community Gay-Torrents.org. The request comes from adult company Flava Works, who warned Cloudflare that it might also face a potential lawsuit of its own if it fails to take action against the website in question. Cloudflare has taken quite a bit of heat from copyright holders in recent months. As one of the leading CDN and DDoS protection services, Cloudflare is used by millions of websites across the globe, some of which are notorious pirate sites. However, instead of proactively taking down these sites, Cloudflare maintains its position as a neutral service provider. If copyright holders want them to take action, they have to follow the legal process. This is the route adult company Flava Works is taking now. The company went to a clerk at the Illinois federal court and succesfully obtained a DMCA subpoena to expose the personal details connected to the account of the gay torrent community Gay-Torrents.org. The order commands CloudFlare to hand over the personal details of the associated account holder within a month. This includes names, addresses, phone numbers, email addresses, account numbers, billing records and other identifying information. Unlike regular subpoenas, DMCA subpoenas are not reviewed by a judge and only require a signature from the court clerk. However, in a letter sent to Cloudflare, Flava Works says that it’s considering further legal steps, if they’re needed. The DMCA subpoena The adult company explains that it sent three DMCA takedown notices to the company, but that dozens of copyright infringing files on Gay-Torrents.org are still being served through Cloudflare’s servers. Flava argued that Cloudflare is required to take proper action against repeat infringers under the DMCA, and wants it to terminate the associated account in its entirety, or face lagal action. “Accordingly, demand is hereby made upon you to immediately and permanently disable and remove the Infringing Site as a repeat infringer and terminate all related accounts,” Flava writes in its letter. “Absent full compliance with this demand, our Client will be forced to investigate all legal remedies available to it, including, without limitation, bringing a civil cause of action against you to compel compliance.” The adult entertainment company ends by saying that it would be in the best interests of all parties to avoid costly litigation, but clearly doesn’t rule out the possibility. It’s doubtful, however, that Cloudflare will be sensitive to this kind of threat. The company has repeatedly said that it follows the letter of the law, and in its opinion this doesn’t cover the termination of clients solely based on third party claims. TorrentFreak reached out to Cloudflare for a comment on the allegations. The company informed us that they have yet to be served with the subpoena, adding that it is Cloudflare’s policy to respond to proper court process once served. https://torrentfreak.com/cloudflare-ordered-to-expose-gay-torrents-operator-or-else-170428/
  15. Name: AoX.to Genre: General Sign-up Link: https://aox.to/sbg_login_classic.php Additional information: Tracker for asian content
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  18. Tracker's Name: JoyHD (JHD) Genre: HD MOVIES / TV / GENERAL Sign-up: https://www.joyhd.net/signup.php Additional information: JoyHD (JHD) is a CHINESE Private Torrent Tracker for HD MOVIES / TV / GENERAL
  19. The trial of the operators of defunct streaming site Swefilmer ended this week with the prosecutor likening the operation to organized crime and seeking lengthy custodial sentences for the men involved. On top, they face potential damages of more than $1m. Founded more than five years ago, Swefilmer grew to become Sweden’s most popular movie and TV show streaming site. It was once said to have accounted for 25% of all web TV viewing in Sweden. In 2015, a 22-year-old Swefilmer operator revealed he’d been raided and in 2016 a Turkish national was arrested in Germany on a secret European arrest warrant. The now 26-year-old was accused of receiving donations from users and setting up Swefilmer’s deals with advertisers. The pair appeared at the Varberg District Court in January, accused of making more than $1.5m from their activities between November 2013 and June 2015. After a few weeks’ suspension, the case got back underway this month, when details of the investigation into the site were revealed to the Court. This week the trial concluded with prosecutor Anna Ginner describing the Swefilmer streaming operation as being like “organized crime”, while demanding a 4.5-year prison sentence for the 26-year-old alongside damages of more than $1.5m. “I say this bears the traits of organized crime. A crime that has drawn in a lot of big money,” said Ginner via video link. “The aim was to provide all visitors of the website Swefilmer an opportunity to see movies for free. The website even placed advertising to encourage more visitors,” she said. “The effect of the business has been that thousands of users have done just that, instead of paying for the Swedish film companies. This has damaged the film studios.” According to local media, the 26-year-old’s lawyer dismissed the prosecution’s claims as “fantasy”, noting that it’s not clear that his client committed any crimes at all. That assertion wasn’t shared by lawyer Henrik Pontén of RightsAlliance. “We must not forget that it is only a small part of the money that we have been able to find. There is a large amount of money that has been lost somewhere in the world,” Pontén said. The prosecution considers the 26-year-old to be the main player behind the site, with the 22-year-old playing a much smaller role. He stands accused of receiving around $4,000 of the proceeds but according to his lawyer Claes Kennedy, no crime was committed, since at the time it had not been established by the EU court that linking to pirated content was illegal. Nevertheless, the prosecution wants the site’s former administrator to receive a year in jail but may settle for a suspended sentence plus community service, a point on which his lawyer agrees. For his part, Henrik Pontén hopes the punishments are closer to the top of the scale as a deterrent to others. “Foreign criminals are attracted to Sweden for the opportunity to earn serious money and receive low penalty rates,” he told Hallands Nyheter. The district court’s decision is due mid-May. https://torrentfreak.com/swefilmer-piracy-trial-ends-operators-face-years-in-jail-170428/
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